Also: Why greenway parks cause greater gentrification, and why U.S. cities are rushing to restrict weed killers.

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***

What We’re Following

Candle in the wind: Much of the California Bay Area was blacked out yesterday, in a move that the state utility said would head off the risk that high winds could spark a deadly blaze. It’s being called a “preemptive blackout.” But what does that really mean? Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E) started shutting down parts of the electricity grid for safety purposes last year after its fragile and poorly maintained power lines helped ignite the deadly Camp Fire in Paradise, California. But this shutdown could last a while—as much as five days in some areas. An estimated 2.4 million people could be in the dark, although the most urbanized parts of the region should be left mostly untouched.

Elected officials and citizens are criticizing the utility for creating the conditions that made this shutdown necessary. PG&E is already under state investigation for last year’s wildfire, and the utility filed for bankruptcy in January, facing billions in liability and possible criminal charges related to its safety record. CityLab’s Sarah Holder has story: The Fears That Shut the Power Off in the Bay Area

Oops: We apologize for a typo in the subject line of yesterday's newsletter. It should have read: "The Cities Where Emissions Are Already Falling." You can still check out our story here.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Why Greenway Parks Cause Greater Gentrification

While green spaces are often linked to gentrification, new research shows certain types and characteristics of urban parks play a much greater role than others.

Richard Florida

A 'Modest Masterpiece' of Public Housing Wins Top Design Prize

Goldsmith Street, a publicly funded development of 105 homes in the U.K. city of Norwich, is a “modest masterpiece,” has won the RIBA Stirling Prize.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Why U.S. Cities Are Rushing to Restrict Some Weed Killers

Seattle has joined Miami, Austin, and other cities in restricting the use of herbicides with glyphosate, such as Roundup.

Jen Monnier

The Politics of an Electric Bike Boom

A rivalry between Paris-area governments has two local leaders vying to be the cleanest and greenest—and pro-bike activity is a clear way for residents to see results.

Feargus O'Sullivan


What We’re Reading

The most detailed map of auto emissions in America (New York Times)

Trump’s trillion-dollar hit to homeowners (ProPublica)

In France, elder care comes with the mail (New Yorker)

The climate crisis in 2050: What happens if cities act but nations don’t? (The Guardian)

What happens when your tweet becomes a subway ad (OneZero)


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