Also: Why the bus got so bad, and how the federal government should tackle the housing crisis.

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***

What We’re Following

Stars fell on Alabama: Earlier this week, Steven Reed won two-thirds of the vote to become the first African-American mayor of Montgomery, Alabama—in its 200th year of existence. Reed’s win adds to the growing number of black mayors currently governing major southern cities, including Richmond, Birmingham, Charlotte, Jackson, New Orleans, and Atlanta. But Reed’s win resonates beyond Montgomery for other historic reasons.

The capital of Alabama is perhaps best known for the famous bus boycott led by Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. that spawned the modern-day civil rights movement. But before that, Montgomery was where the government for the Confederate States of America was first created. With monuments and museums dedicated to those two histories in Montgomery, one of Reed’s biggest challenges could be reconciling the segregation and divisions that those historic markers lay bare. CityLab’s Brentin Mock has the story: The Nation's First Confederate Capital Elects a Black Mayor

P.S. We will be off Monday for whatever your city calls the federal holiday. See you on Tuesday.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Why the Bus Got So Bad, and How to Save It

TransitCenter’s Steven Higashide has created a how-to guide to help city leaders and public transportation advocates save struggling bus systems.

John Surico

This Conservative City Built a $132 Million Park Using One Weird Trick

Oklahoma City’s new Scissortail Park is a serious investment in the public realm, paid for by the city’s special sales tax for capital projects, called MAPS.

Zach Mortice

How Cities Address the Housing Crisis, and Why It’s Not Enough

Local U.S. officials are gathering to discuss the affordable housing crisis—and they say the federal government must do more.

Lisa Bender and Brad Lander

Technology Sabotaged Public Safety Without Us Even Noticing

The tech industry has improved people’s individual, private lives. But it has not necessarily benefited their communal ones.

Ian Bogost

This Is What Adapting to Climate Change Looks Like

PG&E’s blackouts in California are a bleak preview of the disruptions that will become routine in a warmer world.

Robinson Meyer


Oh, the Places You’ll Go!

(David Montgomery/CityLab)

You might think that urban planners would congregate in big coastal metros or cities that top the lists and rankings of “best places.” But some of the highest concentrations of planning jobs can  be found in U.S. state capitals, like Sacramento, Honolulu, Austin, and Raleigh. Many other places suffer from below-average concentrations of planners, marked in blue on the map above by CityLab’s David Montgomery. Richard Florida took a look at where planning jobs are paying the most, and where they’re growing the most. Read more on CityLab: America's Hottest Cities for Urban Planners


What We’re Reading

What Jeff Bezos wants (The Atlantic)

Inside Copenhagen’s race to be the first carbon-neutral city (The Guardian)

What’s lost when a local newspaper withers (Bloomberg)

Minneapolis suspended its scooters ahead of Trump’s rally (The Verge)

How lawmakers are upending the California lifestyle to fight a housing shortage (Los Angeles Times)


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