Also: How Seattle’s city council race became the Amazon election, and how communities can build psychological resilience to disaster.

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***

What We’re Following

Hold the door: Michael Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York City, might just yet enter the 2020 presidential campaign. The New York Times reports that Bloomberg has dispatched staffers to gather signatures in Alabama for Friday’s early candidate filing deadline for its primary, signaling that the billionaire businessman could jump into the race.

If you want a clue on what Bloomberg might be thinking, Face the Nation’s Margaret Brennan asked Bloomberg at CityLab DC just last week whether he had completely closed the door on a presidential run after declaring he would not run last March. “I didn’t say that. It’s just X number of months later and nothing’s changed,” Bloomberg said.

He then elaborated on his dissatisfaction with the existing pool of Democratic candidates: “I have my reservations about the people running and the way they’re campaigning and the promises they’re making that they can’t fulfill and their unwillingness to really admit what is possible and what isn’t,” Bloomberg said. “This is not the way to run a railroad. This country is in real trouble. We need somebody to pull people together.” Brennan replied, “I’m hearing a maybe.”

You can watch their full conversation here.

CityLab context: Why Mayors Are Running

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

How Seattle’s City Council Race Became the Amazon Election

Amazon contributed more than a million dollars to a pro-business PAC in Seattle city council races. But that wasn’t the biggest tech spend in local elections.

Sarah Holder

D.C.’s Vacant Stadium Dilemma

There’s a vacant football and soccer stadium taking up a very desirable plot of federal land in Washington, D.C.—and no one can agree what to do with it.

Kriston Capps

How Communities Can Build Psychological Resilience to Disaster

As climate change makes disasters more severe, researchers say we can prepare by being informed, volunteering, and staying socially connected.

Nicole Wetsman

Oslo Wants to Build the World’s First Zero-Emissions Port

The Port of Oslo is electrifying ferries and taking other steps to slash emissions: “It’s what is necessary if we are going to reach the Paris Agreement.”

Tracey Lindeman



What We’re Reading

Senator Blumenthal calls for Uber and Lyft to share driver data and implement fingerprinting (Washington Post)

Housing discrimination is on the rise, report says (Curbed)

The promise of Mr. Trash Wheel (New Yorker)

Congress is looking into why opportunity zones keep benefiting the wealthy and connected (ProPublica)

The end of the country road (JSTOR Daily)


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