Also: The city known for “sewer socialists” actually has great sewers, and the changing geography of the opioid crisis.

This is a second version of today’s newsletter that corrects two nonworking links in the original. Thanks to those who sent feedback.

What We’re Following

Buffalo chills: As many cities begin to see what a warming world looks like and gear up to mitigate the adverse effects of climate change, Buffalo, New York, is unusually well-insulated from the problem. Rising temperatures have yet to produce more heat waves or extreme rainfall in Western New York and the city had only one 90-degree day in 2019. Experts say the region’s cool climate and ample fresh water could make it an attractive destination as the planet heats up.

What’s more, the city has plenty of space to take in more people after seeing its population decline since the 1950s. The city’s mayor even called it a “Climate Refuge City” in his February 2019 State of the City address. As one SUNY Buffalo State climate scientist put it, “With climate change, the world is going to suck, but Buffalo may suck less.” On CityLab, Jeremy Deaton explores whether the city will be prepared for a potential migrant influx: Will Buffalo Become a Climate Change Haven?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The City Known for ‘Sewer Socialists’ Actually Has Great Sewers

Milwaukee now averages a mere 2.4 combined sewer overflows a year, thanks to a massive underground tunnel, green infrastructure, and flood-control measures.

Zach Brooke

The Changing Geography of the Opioid Crisis

A new study shows that the country faces different opioid challenges in urban and rural areas.

Richard Florida

How the First Aeronauts Transformed Our View of the World

Not so long ago, people had no idea what would happen to them—and what they would see—once they ascended into the clouds.

Jennifer Tucker

Turkeys Are Moving to the Suburbs

Wild turkeys have made a remarkable comeback in the U.S. since the early 20th century, leading to more reports of them causing trouble in the neighborhood.

Linda Poon


Time Capsule

(Madison Johnson/CityLab)

Loyal CityLab readers, we want hear from you! The last ten years have seen cities and metropolitan areas transformed in fundamental ways, while other predictions and promises about urban life haven’t come to pass.

As we reflect on the legacy of the decade, Team CityLab wants your input on what we should be covering and what you saw change in the places where you live. Send a few lines our way in this quick survey: What Defined the Decade From 2010-2020 in Cities?


What We’re Reading

Uber says 3,045 sexual assaults were reported in U.S. rides last year (New York Times)

How America’s second-tier cities can catch the superstars (Bloomberg)

Toronto’s secret success: Suburban buses (The Globe and Mail)

U.S. cities plans for worsening heatwaves fail to protect the vulnerable (The Guardian)

The parenting tax of school choice (JSTOR Daily)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

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