Also: The case for Portland-to-Vancouver high-speed rail, and America’s white-collar workers can’t escape the office.

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***

What We’re Following

Snap off: On Wednesday, the Trump administration took the first step in a series of three major changes that could see millions booted from food benefits. A new rule announced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture would revise work requirements for receiving SNAP benefits, kicking an estimated 688,000 people out of the program. The rule curbs the flexibility of states to provide extra assistance in areas with high unemployment, particularly in response to a recession or other changing economic conditions.

If the change had been in place last year, the total number of households participating in SNAP would have fallen 5 percent in nine states. CityLab’s Kriston Capps has the details on where this change would affect the most people: Thanks to New SNAP Rules, Millions May Lose Food Aid

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Case for Portland-to-Vancouver High-Speed Rail

At the Cascadia Rail Summit outside Seattle, a fledgling scheme to bring high-speed rail from Portland to Vancouver found an enthusiastic reception.

Gregory Scruggs

Why New Development in Baltimore’s Chinatown Is Controversial

As developers turn to Baltimore’s historical Chinatown, Ethiopian residents worry about displacement while others worry about cultural commodification.

Amir Khafagy

America’s White-Collar Workers Can't Escape the Office

Thanks to the internet, every hour is a potential working hour.

Derek Thompson

20 Years Ago, Seattle Redefined the Modern Protest

The 1999 WTO protests shut down Seattle and brought new attention to the effects of global trade. The event looms large in the activist imagination today.

Gregory Scruggs


Worlds Apart

Tehran on the left, Pittsburgh on the right. (The Other Apartment)

You’re not seeing double. Those are two different apartments in the photo above. Two artists have put the idea of visiting someone else’s home to a new test with an installation called The Other Apartment. Over four months this year, Sohrab Kashani and Jon Rubin recreated Kashani’s Tehran apartment more than 6,300 miles away inside Pittsburgh’s Mattress Factory Art Museum.

Bridging the geographic, cultural, and political divides between Iran and the United States is tough enough, but Kashani and Rubin face another hurdle: collaborating across the Trump administration’s 2017 travel ban. They made the duplicate apartment by coordinating entirely through photos, sketches, spreadsheets, and video chats. On CityLab: In ‘The Other Apartment,’ One Home Spans a Deep Divide


What We’re Reading

Attorney General William Barr said “communities” that protest cops could lose “the police protection they need” (Washington Post)

Installing free Wi-Fi to help count rural communities of color in 2020 Census (NPR)

The sordid history of housing discrimination in America (Vox)

Parking lots, once asphalt wasteland, become golden opportunities (New York Times)

Kamala Harris’s criminal justice record killed her presidential run (The Appeal)


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