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A Clinton-Kaine campaign sign is seen behind a Trump-Pence sign in adjacent yards.

Why Suburban Swing Voters May Be Less Common Than You Think

A new poll finds that far from being more moderate than urban or rural voters, suburbanites are actually more partisan.

CityLab Daily: The Blurring of America’s Urban Neighborhoods

Also: The curious politics of a mega-mall, and a red-state YIMBY bill.

MapLab: Invisible Trespassers

A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

A small blue heron catches a fish in a marsh in the Florida Everglades.

Why Planned Oil Drilling in the Everglades Has Florida Cities Worried

A Florida appeals court has approved exploratory oil drilling in the Everglades, prompting worries about Miami’s water supply and risks to the wetland ecosystem.

The Curious Politics of a Montreal Mega-Mall

The car-dependent suburb it’ll be built in wants to greenlight Royalmount against the city government’s wishes but it needs them to pay for the public infrastructure.

A photo of a new subdivision under construction in South Jordan, Utah.

A Red-State Take on a YIMBY Housing Bill

Utah’s SB 34, aimed at increasing the state’s supply of affordable housing, may hold lessons for booming cities of the Mountain West, and beyond.

Multicolored maps of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Tampa, denoting neighborhood fragmentation

Urban Neighborhoods, Once Distinct by Race and Class, Are Blurring

Yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods.

CityLab Daily: Queens’ Housing After Amazon

Also: The car loan trap, and a visual history of the public library.

A History of the American Public Library

A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

There’s a Tile Theft Epidemic in Lisbon

With a single azulejo fetching hundreds of euros at the city’s more reputable antique stores, these tiles, sitting there out in the open, are easy pickings.

Farm manager Zodidi Meke at the Philippi Urban Agriculture Academy in Cape Town.

Cape Town Is Food-Rich, so Why Are Some Residents Food Insecure?

Cape Town in South Africa is a foodie destination. Some people in its renowned restaurant industry are trying to spread the food wealth citywide.

Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

A photo of a new car dealership

If the Economy Is So Great, Why Are Car Loan Defaults at a Record High?

For low-income buyers, new predatory lending techniques may make it easier to get behind the wheel, and harder to escape a debt trap.

CityLab Daily: The Wall’s Eminent Domain Problem

Also: Unpacking New York’s ejection of Amazon, and a short history of Germany’s beloved Schwebebahn.

I Answered Strangers’ Philosophical Questions on the Street

An “Ask a Philosopher” booth in New York City attracted a surprising number of people with deep, meaningful questions that had long gone unanswered.

The Town Where Retirees Can’t Retire

In fast-aging pockets of rural America, older residents are going back to work. But not always because they need the money.

A Border Patrol agent looks on near a border wall that separates the cities of Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego.

Lawmakers Aim to Protect Private Landowners on U.S.-Mexico Border

Members of Congress hope to pass laws to help border-adjacent property owners who may be displaced through eminent domain if Trump’s border wall plans proceed.

With Trains Like Schwebebahn, No Wonder Germans Love Public Transit

Infrastructure like this makes it clear why Germany continues to produce enthusiasm for public transit, generation after generation.

Capturing Black Bottom, a Detroit Neighborhood Lost to Urban Renewal

“Black Bottom Street View,” now exhibiting at the Detroit Public Library, thoughtfully displays old images of the historic African American neighborhood in its final days.

A Valentine’s Day Tradition, Born in the Heart of Boston

In the 1800s, candy helped make Boston an industrial powerhouse. Candy hearts have been a lasting legacy of that era, though their future is less certain.