All Articles

London’s Latest Bit of Rail Infrastructure Is a Very Old Street

After a revamp, a tunneled Victorian thoroughfare has become part of London Bridge Station.

CityLab Daily: How Beverly Hills Fights a Metro Expansion

Also: Milwaukee’s plan for 10,000 affordable homes, and why global talent clusters around cities.

Beverly Hills Has Financed Its Metro Fight With $13 Million In Local Taxes

Instead of reconstructing aging school facilities, the district is using a voter-backed ballot measure to pay for a legal campaign against a subway extension.

A yellow snail enjoys a refreshing beverage during a heat wave in Bern, Switzerland.

Cities Are Turning Snails Yellow

Urban areas are heat islands. Could that be dictating the color of their gastropods?

A vacant home on Milwaukee's north side.

Can Milwaukee Really Create 10,000 Affordable Homes?

The city has an ambitious plan to fix its housing woes. But so far, most of development has been focused on the city’s downtown area.

A crane in front of a destroyed house.

On Long Island, Failure to Absorb Sandy’s Lessons

Six years after Sandy hit New York killing 43 people and destroying numerous homes, waterfront development in the region continues with scant attention to cohesive storm-mitigation strategy.

Why Some Home Prices Rebound Quickly After a Forest Fire

A ruined view following a wildfire affects property values, but only because it's a painful reminder of risk, economists find.

Reconstructing Hurricane Harvey to Find Its Overlooked Victims

Will Houston’s data-driven approach help it distribute recovery funds more fairly?

An Uber pick-up location in downtown Houston in 2017.

Is Uber the Enemy or Ally of Public Transit?

Depends on the city, and the transit agency.

Why Marriott Workers Are Striking

In Marriott hotels across the country, employees are striking for better wages and benefits—but also for the right to decide how technology is used in their industry.

CityLab Daily: The Problem With ‘Humans of HUD’

Also: The neighborhoods buried in student debt, and the fight to integrate New York’s specialized schools.

The Fight to Integrate New York City’s Specialized Schools Is Misguided

It affirms a supremacist mentality. I thought we were done propping that up.

What HUD Sees

The federal agency just launched a feel-good photoblog called "Humans of HUD." Just what are these portraits of real-life housing aid recipients telling us?

A pink-shaded map of Los Angeles showing student debt burden

The Neighborhoods Buried In Student Debt

How much of your paycheck goes towards student loans?

The Face Behind Pittsburgh’s Modernism

Tasso Katselas was prolific in his home city for the second half of the 20th century, but his work remains underappreciated.

Yes, 311 Nuisance Calls Are Climbing in Gentrifying Neighborhoods

A new analysis by the Science vs. podcast team crunches the numbers on which New York City blocks are seeing spikes in calls complaining about other residents.

A sign says "wait here to vote" with a woman visible in the background.

Where Voter Suppression Hits Hardest in Georgia

In the swiftly diversifying Gwinnett County, the second largest county in Georgia, the best way to vote freely and fairly in the upcoming midterms is if you’re white.

Students celebrate at commencement holding inflatable globes.

Why Global Talent Clusters Around Cities

For now, U.S. cities lead in attracting global talent, but cities across the world are coming on strong.