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A man wipes his forehead in a park on a hot summer day.

Climate Change Might Be Bad for Your Mental Health, Too

Average monthly highs above 86 degrees Fahrenheit increase the probability of mental-health issues, a new study finds.

Where It’s Legal to Reverse the Vote of the People

More citizen-initiated measures are making it onto the ballot than ever before. But in cities and states where they’re able, legislators are taking steps to alter them.

Is Transit Doomed in the U.S.? Discuss.

Two rival pundits face off over federal funding, the transit “death spiral,” and where all the riders have gone.

The ‘Cafes’ Where Women Go to Breastfeed

Come for the free lactation consultation. Stay for the fellow moms.

CityLab Daily: The Sudden Growth of Hurricane Michael

Also today: How America fails at communicating flood risks, and Paris is preparing for a warming world.

The eye of a hurricane

The Sudden, Shocking Growth of Hurricane Michael

In little more than a day, a Category 1 storm became a “worst-case scenario” Category 4.

How America Fails at Communicating Flood Risks

We have good data about flood risks. The challenge is getting it to people when they need it, in a way that’s useful.

Interpreting Africa’s Visible, and Invisible, Borders

In the eighth “Invisible Borders” road trip, a group of African artists and writers send dispatches from the continent’s cities and border towns.

MapLab: 4,000 Hours of North America

A biweekly tour of the ever-expanding cartographic landscape.

Adults and children explore an urban play-garden.

A City That Takes Climate Change Seriously: Paris

The French capital, under Mayor Anne Hidalgo, could be a model for how cities can mitigate and plan for climate change. But change has not come easily.

Americans Strongly Dislike PC Culture

Youth isn’t a good proxy for support of political correctness, and race isn’t either.

The Concrete of Hong Kong

What happens when you take the paint and neon out of the megacity? Pascal Greco’s stark photos reveal a harshly built environment.

CityLab Daily: Why Transit Works Better Outside the U.S.

Also today: America is losing its edge for startups, and when neighborhood diversity means white anxiety.

Why Public Transportation Works Better Outside the U.S.

The widespread failure of American mass transit is usually blamed on cheap gas and suburban sprawl. But the full story of why other countries succeed is more complicated.

Preserving the Shotgun Homes of Miami’s 19th Century Immigrants

Many descendants of the original Coconut Grove community own property in the neighborhood today, but development is a serious concern and a large part of the community is fighting to protect their homes.

CityLab Daily: Your Transportation Choices Matter

Also today: How to fix badly planned American cities, and Gritty of brotherly love.

Traffic on a Colorado highway is engulfed in smoke from a wildfire in 2012.

The Planet Can't Survive Our Transportation Habits

In light of the IPCC’s dire report, substituting some personal convenience in the present could mean that much more hope for the planet’s future.

A man in a blazer stands on a stage giving a presentation

America Is Losing Its Edge for Startups

It used to be that 95 percent of global startup and venture-capital activity happened in the U.S. Today, it’s just over one-half.

The Town That Doesn’t Exist

Slab City, buried deep in the California desert, is a land of squatters, artists, and migrants—and few rules. In a new book, an architect and a photographer document “the last free place.”