Kristine Brown

Many young black males don't see reading as part of their identity, one NYC educator believes. Haircut by haircut, he's trying to fix that.

There's a classic marketing theory that when you put two words or ideas together enough, consumers will form an implicit association—and even act. I say "peanut butter," you think, "jelly." I play French music in my grocery store, you buy a bottle of Burgundy. One is a trigger for the other.

Improbable, perhaps, that a chestnut from advertising would form the basis of an elegant and innovative literacy initiative. But when Alvin Irby was teaching kindergarten and first grade in Harlem and the Bronx, he saw that many of his students—especially African American boys—needed new associations around books. Statistically, those boys are the most reluctant when it comes to reading—and lag most in test scores.

"I'm developing this theory that a lot of young black males simply don't associate books with their identity," says Irby. "Fathers are missing from a lot of black children's early reading experiences. There aren't many black male teachers, either."

That's how Barbershop Books was born. Irby, now just a few weeks away from a master's degree in public administration from New York University’s Wagner School of Public Service, had a simple idea: Go to neighborhood barbershops that African American families visit on a regular basis. Set up a shelf of children's books specially selected to appeal to young boys (action-packed, culturally relatable, and led by male characters). Get the barbers to encourage boys to pick up "No, David!" or "Calling All Cars!" while they wait for their haircut, or even once they're in the chair.

Even if the book is a little above or below the kid's reading level, and even if there's not an adult sitting next to him as he reads, boys are still making an implicit link between reading and barbershops—which are cultural hubs in New York City's African American communities. The bit of encouragement from the barber, most often an older black man, is essential too.

(Kristine Brown)

"If I pair reading with barbershops, over time, when a kid sees a barbershop, they'll think about reading," says Irby. "That really has the potential to overcome this negative self-perception, this idea that black boys don't read."

And, crucially, Barbershop Books gets kids to read during out-of-school hours—an important part in closing the literacy gap for one of the nation's most vulnerable groups. According to 2013 data from KIDS COUNT, just 10 percent of African-American boys from low-income families are reading proficiently in fourth grade, compared to 25 percent of their white peers. Access to age-appropriate books tends to be lower in poorer neighborhoods. Children of color disproportionately receive under-resourced, ineffective instruction from public schools. And minority kids from low-income families suffer the most from a lack of out-of-school reading support. With low literacy linked to incarceration rates, the stakes are very, very high.

(Kristine Brown)

Jen Rinehart, Vice President of Research and Policy at the Afterschool Alliance, says Irby's identity-driven approach resonates with other learning achievement research she's seen. "If you think of yourself as reader, you're more inclined to read," she says. "And that should impact your performance."

So far, Irby has six barbershops set up in Harlem and Brooklyn. He's looking to expand to 25 by September, with the help of $5,000 that he and a team of other NYU students won for Barbershop Books, as finalists in UPenn's Fels Public Policy Challenge. He's looking for additional funding for the project while fielding calls from people in other cities who want books with their haircuts, too.

Eventually, though, Irby hopes to expand his work beyond barbershops and get all kinds of kids reading for fun in a range of settings. "Ultimately, I want to improve the lives of all children," he says.

Good thing. Young girls of color could use extra help, too.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    If You Drive Less Than 10,000 Miles a Year, You Probably Shouldn't Own a Car

    Up to one-quarter of all U.S. drivers might be better off using ride-sharing services instead.

  2. Transportation

    How Seattle Bucked a National Trend and Got More People to Ride the Bus

    Three experts in three very different positions weigh in on their city’s ridership success.

  3. Equity

    The Side Pittsburgh Doesn't Want You to See

    Pittsburgh filmmaker Chris Ivey has spent over twelve years documenting the lives of the people displaced so that the city can achieve its “cool” status.  

  4. Construction workers build affordable housing units.
    Equity

    Why Is 'Affordable' Housing So Expensive to Build?

    As costs keep rising, it’s becoming harder and harder for governments to subsidize projects like they’ve done in the past.

  5. Equity

    Seattle Has 5 Big Pieces of Advice for Amazon’s HQ2 Winner

    Being HQ1 has been no picnic.