Wikimedia Commons / Ildar Sagdejev, Flickr / Matthew Hurst

A special deal on citations, just in time for the season of giving.

Get your corn, your beans, and your soup to Lexington, Kentucky, as long as they’re in cans. From November 16 to December 18, the local parking authority is accepting canned food for outstanding parking citations, in place of cold, hard cash.

Ten cans of food are worth one $15 credit, the Associated Press reports. (Citations above $15 must be paid in the aforementioned cash.) Those with multiple parking citations are permitted to donate ten cans of food for each offense.

The food will be donated to God’s Pantry Food Bank network, which provides more than 121,400 meals per day to hungry people and families in central and eastern Kentucky. “One expired parking meter ticket could mean two meals for hungry Fayette County families,” God's Pantry CEO Marian Guinn told the AP.

Last year’s “Food for Fines” program, Lexington’s first, collected 6,200 cans of food for 600 parking meter citations. This year, organizers will accept canned food for any parking citations issued by the parking authority or by the police.

Food can hoarders who like to park in illegal places might want to consider Albany, New York, as a new home: They also run a “Food for Fines” program. Non-perishable food lovers with a corresponding book hoarding problem might want to check out Coralville, Iowa, or Monmouth County, New Jersey, whose public libraries periodically allow overdue fines to be paid in food, too.

Top image: Wikimedia Commons / Ildar Sagdejev, Flickr / Matthew Hurst

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  2. A Vancouver house designed in a modern style
    POV

    How Cities Get 'Granny Flats' Wrong

    A Vancouver designer says North American cities need bolder policies to realize the potential of accessory dwellings.

  3. A scene from Hey Arnold! is pictured.
    Life

    Even Hey Arnold's Neighborhood Is Gentrifying Now

    Series creator Craig Bartlett explains how he built the cartoon city that every ‘90s kid dreamed of living in.

  4. Equity

    Counting Down to a Census Doomsday

    Top-level vacancies and flatlined funding appear to be the Trump administration’s plans for the Census Bureau.

  5. Pont Des Arts in Paris
    Design

    Paris Wants to Build a Few Garden Bridges

    Here’s what it should learn from London’s infamous efforts to build one.