Wikimedia Commons / Ildar Sagdejev, Flickr / Matthew Hurst

A special deal on citations, just in time for the season of giving.

Get your corn, your beans, and your soup to Lexington, Kentucky, as long as they’re in cans. From November 16 to December 18, the local parking authority is accepting canned food for outstanding parking citations, in place of cold, hard cash.

Ten cans of food are worth one $15 credit, the Associated Press reports. (Citations above $15 must be paid in the aforementioned cash.) Those with multiple parking citations are permitted to donate ten cans of food for each offense.

The food will be donated to God’s Pantry Food Bank network, which provides more than 121,400 meals per day to hungry people and families in central and eastern Kentucky. “One expired parking meter ticket could mean two meals for hungry Fayette County families,” God's Pantry CEO Marian Guinn told the AP.

Last year’s “Food for Fines” program, Lexington’s first, collected 6,200 cans of food for 600 parking meter citations. This year, organizers will accept canned food for any parking citations issued by the parking authority or by the police.

Food can hoarders who like to park in illegal places might want to consider Albany, New York, as a new home: They also run a “Food for Fines” program. Non-perishable food lovers with a corresponding book hoarding problem might want to check out Coralville, Iowa, or Monmouth County, New Jersey, whose public libraries periodically allow overdue fines to be paid in food, too.

Top image: Wikimedia Commons / Ildar Sagdejev, Flickr / Matthew Hurst

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