A view of downtown Pittsburgh from the Duquesne Incline on Mt. Washington. David Denoma/AP

A morning roundup of the day's news.

Alt plans: A city-led “Prayer for Pittsburgh, Prayer for Peace” event will take place Friday, Mayor Bill Peduto announced, supplanting plans for a “March on Google” demonstration that, post-Charlottesville, had stoked fears of violence and associations with hate groups. Organizers of the March on Google have now postponed plans for demonstrations in Pittsburgh and eight other cities this weekend, The Pittsbugh Post-Gazette reports:

March organizers portrayed their plans as a pro-free-speech response to corporate behavior at Google, including the recent firing of James Damore. The company let him go after he wrote a memo widely viewed as sexist and anti-diversity.

In declaring Wednesday that the protests were postponed, a march organizer alleged that left-wing extremists had made credible “terrorist threats” against the effort. His online announcement did not present any evidence.

Why DOJ Loves Miami: Visiting Miami yesterday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions praised the city for its “full compliance” with federal immigration enforcement while lambasting Chicago—which sued the Justice Department just over a week ago—for its defiance. (New York Times)

Fact check: The Washington Post gives President Trump “four Pinocchios” for his claim Tuesday that his administration is “doing far more than anybody’s done with respect to inner cities,” first tackling the problem of the phrase “inner cities” to begin with, then analyzing how proposed budgets for housing, education, and jobs would in fact hurt urban areas.

Where are the women urbanists? Curbed’s Alissa Walker assesses the recent rise of “self-aware gentrifiers” from the angle of gender, questioning why men are driving the conversation on why cities change.

Signal-free streets: As cities around the world experiment with stripping streets of traffic lights, stop signs, and other conventional barriers, The Guardian presents videos of such intersections that some experts say prove increased safety and sociability for all users—not “pure traffic chaos.”

Nightlife trends: Washington, D.C. has experienced a “nightlife boom” in recent years, going from about 800 bars, restaurants, and nightclubs in 2008 to just under 1,300 in 2016. Looking closely at the numbers, though, Greater Greater Washington sees that many of these new businesses are short-lived, while a spike in closures last year could signal the end of the boom.

Protecting newborns: In an effort to reduce racial disparities in infant mortalities, Baltimore, New York, Tampa, and Chicago are now enlisting “doulas” to assist expectant mothers—a model that’s attracting interest from other city health departments. (Stateline)

The urban lens:

#flashbackfriday to walking around the streets of Akihabara in Tokyo 🗻

A post shared by 🔹Michael Alwill (@michaelalwill) on


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