Paul Ryan is pictured.
Yuri Gripas/Reuters

This is a preview of an upcoming CityLab Daily newsletter. We’re experimenting with it, so if you’ve come across this page, let us know what you think! Send your feedback at hello@citylab.com.

What’s the GOP getting for Christmas: The holiday scramble begins this week for Republicans in Congress, as the GOP aims to pass a tax bill and get a budget deal to avoid a government shutdown by the end of the week. The tax plan’s final language emerged Friday and many small tax credit programs were spared from previously drafted cuts. Kriston Capps writes that even with the updates, the bill presents a challenge to addressing America’s continuing inequality:

So while Congress avoided some of the worst-possible outcomes with this bill with regard to affordable housing, municipal development, infrastructure, and transit, it still makes all these things harder to do. ... In broad strokes, the Republican tax reform bill means that your city and state just got a budget cut.

The cap on state and local tax deductions will still hit high-tax states like California and New York, making it harder to raise revenue in urban areas without such a subsidy.

Delta blues: Speaking of holiday scrambles, the world’s busiest airport, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International, has restored power after a 12-hour outage Sunday that delayed about 5,100 flights. Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed said an electrical fire started in a Georgia Power underground electrical facility, damaging two substations that serve the airport.

After the storm: Puerto Rico’s governor has ordered a review of every death on the island since Hurricane Maria. The official count of 64 is far below the figures compiled by news agencies. After three months, parts of the island are still without power—and now the island faces a looming foreclosure crisis. CityLab context: Is solar the answer to Puerto Rico's blackout?

Just in: Reports of an Amtrak derailment just outside of Seattle on I-5. Check CityLab later for more on this story.


More on CityLab

Teaching Civility in the Age of Trump

As bias incidents at American schools surge, one Maryland high school requires all freshman to take a new course designed to encourage open minds and civil dialogue.

Stories From the Rust Belt, For the Rust Belt

“I think it’s important for these writers to say, ‘Look, your creativity, your writing, your research, your journalism, matters just as much in Pittsburgh as it does in New York and D.C.”

Switzerland's Border-Busting Streetcar Rolls Into France and Germany

A new extension makes it the world’s only tri-national tram system.

What Can Cities and States Do About Net Neutrality?

The plans so far are to be defiant and take the FCC to court. Beyond that, there’s a limited slate of options.

The Ambitious Design and Low Density of Toronto's Newest Subway Stations

Despite its shortcomings, the scope of the 5.3-mile Spadina line addition is ambitious.

L.A.'s Air Pollution May Be Harming Teen Brains

A new study from the University of Southern California suggests a link between air pollution and adolescent delinquency.

Why Don't America's Rich Give More to Charity?

They could certainly afford to donate bigger sums, but something seems to be holding them back.

The Urban Lens:

Instagram photo from @rznagle

Want to see your photo here? Share your city on Instagram using #citylabontheground.


What We’re Reading

No halt to evictions around the country as temperature fall (NPR)

What Target’s CEO thinks about the ‘retail apocalypse’ (Bloomberg)

Ford’s new start-up-style base in Detroit (New York Times)

‘Innovations that made the city’ is like an advent calendar for urbanists (Sidewalk Labs)

Will the suburbs swing the House to Democrats in 2018? (New York Times)


About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Perspective

    In a Pandemic, We're All 'Transit Dependent'

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

  2. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

  3. Equity

    What Bigotry Looks Like During Social Distancing

    As reports of harassment and assault against Asian Americans increase, community advocates are finding new ways to tackle the spread of xenophobia.

  4. photo: San Francisco Municipal Transit Agency employees turn an empty cable car in San Francisco on March 4.
    Transportation

    As Coronavirus Quiets Streets, Some Cities Speed Road and Transit Fixes

    With cities in lockdown and workplaces closed, the big drop in traffic and transit riders allows road repair and construction projects to rush forward.

  5. A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.
    Equity

    The Geography of Coronavirus

    What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

×