Shotguns are shown for sale at the AO Sword gun store in El Cajon, California.
Mike Blake/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Cities vs. DOD: New York City, Philadelphia, and San Francisco have teamed up for a lawsuit against the Defense Department, alleging that many service members disqualified from gun ownership weren’t reported to the national background check system. The case responds to the Texas church massacre last month, which involved a former Air Force member. AP reports:

Philadelphia in particular has been plagued by gun violence and “relies on this reporting when making the crucial decision whether a license-to-carry applicant should be permitted to carry a firearm,” said Mayor Jim Kenney, who is a Democrat like the mayors of New York and San Francisco. “We’re joining in this suit because reporting these records is absolutely critical to those decisions. The background check system only works if it contains the proper records.”

Safer AND more dangerous: An Associated Press analysis using ten years of crime data shows a growing contradiction in large cities like Chicago—soaring homicide rates are increasingly concentrated in small areas, while the rest of the city grows safer. Researchers link the disparity to job loss, segregation, and the widening wealth gap.

Philly’s preservation squad: A new task force focuses on the city’s “demolition crisis,” which is endangering historic buildings, including a slew of aging churches that congregations don’t know how to handle. (Next City)

UberEats explosion: In several cities across the globe—including 19 in Europe—the fast-growing food delivery service is outpacing Uber’s conventional ride-sharing service. (Business Insider)  

Refugees running for office: It’s not a new phenomenon, but many local refugee candidates have had a new source of inspiration this year: responding to President Trump. (Governing)

  • Also from Governing: Some cities and states are stepping out of the box in how they market themselves to tourists, i.e. Albuquerque pitching its “Breaking Bad” connections.

Coyote chase: The rise of “urban hunting” for coyotes is setting off debates of how city dwellers should best respond to the return of this proliferating, adaptable predator. (New York Times)

Denver’s cycling progress: Streetsblog Denver tallies the successes and failures of the city’s bike projects over 2017.

The urban lens:

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