Also today: Mayors speak up for Salvadoran immigrants, and how to create better jobs.

In the News

Undocked: Is dockless bikeshare making cycling more diverse? Anecdotally, the five privately-operated dockless companies in D.C. have been reaching neighborhoods where the city’s conventional docked bikeshare has been slower to get cycling. With fewer infrastructure needs and smartphone accessibility, it’s possible that dockless bikeshare may be expanding cycling in the city to a more diverse and younger group of riders.

Mayors speak up: Mayors have been among the most vocal opponents to President Trump’s decision to halt temporary protection of immigrants to El Salvador. In a letter just days before his announcement, 19 mayors said the move “will divide families and harm our cities,” and asked the State Department for an 18-month extension of the protected status that shielded about 200,000 Salvadorans from deportation after a pair of earthquakes struck the country in 2001.

Robert Moses in a bottle: We’re still finding debris from the old days of urban renewal in Brooklyn, as remnants of a 1953 newspaper washed ashore on Barren Island reveal.


Today on CityLab

How to Create More and Better Jobs: A new report details strategies and lessons from the U.K.

When a Tech Giant Plays Waterfront Developer: A “smart city” in Toronto might be a smart real-estate play for Sidewalk Labs. And for the public?

One Way to Fight HUD's Heel-Dragging on Fair Housing: As civil rights groups line up in opposition to a new HUD rule, a legal strategy emerges.

Low-Income Communities Are Struggling to Support Churches: The institutions need money to serve people. But in many cases, they get that money from those they serve.

Why Environmentalists Are Poking Holes in Pittsburgh's Climate Action Plan: Mayor Bill Peduto still has a June 1 tweet pinned to the top of his Twitter page: “As the Mayor of Pittsburgh, I can assure you that we will follow the guidelines of the Paris Agreement.” But how can the city deliver on that promise?


Map of the Day

The online comic strip xkcd has a superb and simple answer to the evergreen problem of the standard red-blue election map:

Tweet from @AlanMCole

As Alan Cole explains, this map avoids the issue of giving too much weight to unpopulated land and captures an accurate distribution of the popular vote without being extremely granular.


What We’re Reading

How the borders of school zones affect segregation (Vox)

Comparing China’s faux Paris to the real one (Fast Company)

Universal Basic Income… for kids? (Washington Post)

A round up of urban transportation ideas at CES 2018 (Curbed)

Look out, Oprah: If John Mayer were Mayor (New Yorker)

When the subway becomes a rolling shelter for the homeless (New York Times)


What’s going on in your neighborhood? Send stories, tips, and feedback to hello@citylab.com.

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