Also today: The HQ2 tea leaves, and congestion pricing for New York City.

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***

What We’re Following

With the late-breaking news that the federal government shutdown is headed toward its conclusion, we can turn our attention to… infrastructure week?

Should transit agencies panic?: With seemingly endless innovations in the transportation sphere, there’s a tendency to prophesize how technology will one day make “transit monopolies” obsolete. That’s going overboard, transit consultant Jarrett Walker writes for CityLab, and he warns public agencies against believing the doomsday hype about disruption.

HQ2 tea leaves: Brookings looks into the transportation and housing needs of the 20 cities left in Amazon’s search for its second headquarters. Also: The Penn Institute for Urban Research has 11 urban experts weigh in on the $5 billion question: Will cities win or lose with HQ2? CityLab will be digging into some of these findings and arguments in the coming days.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Does Segregation Beget Segregation?

Two poverty researchers discuss about the social forces reinforcing the cycle of segregation.

Dwyer Gunn

Could Congestion Pricing Finally Work for New York City?

A fee-based plan may be the only hope for the city’s costly transportation crisis.

Laura Bliss

More Bike Lanes Could Save up to 10,000 Lives a Year in Europe

A study of 167 European cities lays out the positive effects—and limits—of investing in more cycling infrastructure.

Feargus O'Sullivan

How Toronto Turned an Airport Rail Failure Into a Commuter Asset

The Union Pearson Express launched with expensive rides and low ridership. Now, with fares slashed in half and a light rail connection in the works, it’s a legitimate transit alternative for workers.

Chris Bateman

The Psychology of Boston's Snow Parking Wars

In Boston, Chicago, and Philadelphia, an informal code allows residents to claim a parking space shoveling it out. But the practice is often at odds both with the law and with the mores of changing neighborhoods.

Steve Holt


The Ghosts of Urban Renewal

Illustrated text from "Even the Dead Could Not Stay"
Caption

Long before Roanoke, Virginia, experienced its downtown revival, a 1950s urban renewal project uprooted the city’s black residents. In an illustrated story for CityLab, Martha Park explains that the scars of that removal are still there.


What We’re Reading

Photos from the Women’s March rallies in cities around the globe (New York Times)

The potential pitfalls of electric cars (Wired)

Apple and Google reroute San Francisco shuttle buses after attacks (Fortune)

Don’t blame robots for Donald Trump (Bloomberg)

How much warmer was your city in 2017? (New York Times)


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