Also today: Who owns urban mobility data, and how did Baltimore leave its students in the cold?

In the News

Hold up: In opposing the New York Police Department’s stop-and-frisk practices, reformers have long pointed to immediate effects on crime. But in an NYT op-ed, Phillip Atiba Goff, president of the Center for Policing Equity, issues a call for more research about the policy’s lingering effects on communities. The problem, he argues, “is that crime has traditionally been the only outcome deemed important enough to measure.” But the unexplored consequences potentially range from health to voter turnout—and knowing more is crucial for police accountability.

  • In August, CityLab’s Brentin Mock wrote about what stop-and-frisk looks like now, four years after the Supreme Court ruled that the earlier iteration was unconstitutional.

Disastrous: NOAA makes it official: 2017 was America’s costliest year for weather and climate disasters, to the tune of $306 billion. There were 16 events that exceeded a billion dollars in damage, with Hurricane Harvey topping the list with $125 billion. Last week, we wrote about how urban policy could rebuild Houston after the storm.


Today on CityLab

The Safe Way to Ride Your Bike in Winter: Want to keep cycling when it’s icy? Here are some practical tips.

How Baltimore Students Got Left in the Cold: The heating crisis that closed the city’s public schools isn’t just about a lack of resources.

Who Owns Urban Mobility Data?: Policymakers need it; private transportation companies have it. Here’s one way to broker a solution.

The Problem With Australia’s Next Apple Store: The company’s latest flagship will displace an Aboriginal cultural center in Melbourne.

California’s Pot Industry Faces Major Obstacles to Wildfire Recovery: The murky legal status of cannabis leaves growers without access to insurance or disaster recovery funds. Some fear that could steer farmers onto the black market.


Number of the Day: 340

That’s how many new miles of dedicated rail and rapid bus routes are expected to open this year in North America—at a cost of $13.2 billion. (That and much, much more in Yonah Freemark’s estimate of the upcoming transit projects for 2018.)


What We’re Reading

Kingston, the birth city of reggae, remixes its noise ordinances (Next City)

The #MeToo project highlights harassment on the D.C. Metro (Washington Post)

California proposes workaround on the SALT deduction cap (Curbed)

How does your landlord calculate your rent? (New York Times)

Google Street View with an AI soundtrack (Fast Company)


What’s going on in your neighborhood? Send stories, tips, and feedback to hello@citylab.com.

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