Also today: The tide turns against partisan gerrymandering, and U.S road safety laws fall behind.

What We’re Following

Mind your ‘manders: Pennsylvania’s congressional map is going back to the drawing board after the state’s supreme court ruled the current map skews too heavily in favor of Republicans. With a handful of these cases in court this year, it’s time to ask: Has the tide turned against partisan gerrymandering? More: The New York Times toys with how unfair it can make Pennsylvania’s districts.

Listen up: CityLab’s Laura Bliss sat down with The Mobility Podcast at this month’s Transportation Research Board conference to discuss some of her recent reporting. Don’t miss her tale of a plea for congestion pricing scrawled on a bathroom stall.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Where Amazon HQ2 Could Worsen Affordability the Most

Some of the cities dubbed finalists in Amazon’s headquarters search are likely to see a greater strain on their housing market, a new analysis finds.

Tanvi Misra

Can a 'New Localism' Help Cities Transcend Gridlock?

Bruce Katz and Jeremy Nowak talk about the model of collaborative urban leadership in their book The New Localism.

Richard Florida

U.S. Road Safety Laws Lag, While Fatalities Climb

The U.S. traffic mortality rate far outstrips global peers. Here’s how state legislators could intervene.

Laura Bliss

Moving Americans Out of Poverty Will Take More Than Money

A who’s-who of poverty experts outline an ambitious blueprint for “changing the narrative” about being poor in America.

Michael Anft

Craft Beer Is the Strangest, Happiest Economic Story in America

Corporate goliaths are taking over the U.S. economy, yet small breweries are thriving. Why?

Derek Thompson


Video of the Day

Screenshot from Vox's "It’s not you. Commuting is bad for your health."
(Vox)

Vox’s Kimberly Mas declares “my side hustle is commuting” in an explainer on how commuting is bad for our health. Long commutes are common—and the negative effects vary by mode of travel—but the trip to work may also give us some much-needed alone time. CityLab context: Your commute is slowly killing you.


What We’re Reading

A block party to stop traffic apps (Miami Herald)

Hey, where’s our ‘get out jail free’ card? (BBC)

When gentrification isn’t about housing (New York Times Magazine)

The radical idea of work without jobs (The Guardian)

Three American products that explain NAFTA (New York Times)

Supreme Court rules on a vacant house bachelor party in D.C. (Washington Post)


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