Also today: A portrait of Parkland, Florida, and Seattle is winning the war on the car commute.

A portrait of Parkland: Before Wednesday’s shooting, some families who moved to the Florida suburb looking for safe neighborhoods and top-notch schools considered it “paradise.” CityLab Latino’s Juan Pablo Garnham has the story from the community.

Bikeshare beware: With a smartphones-plus-bikes combination, dockless bikesharing has unlocked a new kind of mobility in American cities. But as you freewheel around town, that technological pairing beams up personal information—your name, payment information, and location—to the system’s operators. That data might roam all the way to China, where dockless companies like Mobike and Ofo are based. CityLab’s Laura Bliss dives into why that data trove is raising eyebrows among cybersecurity and data privacy experts.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Cities: Don’t Just Wait for the Feds

Even after the current occupant of the White House moves on, the federal government will be severely limited in its ability to deal with the nation’s most pressing problems.

Bruce Katz and Jeremy Nowak

How Seattle Is Winning the War on the Car Commute

Despite massive job growth, just 25 percent of workers drove themselves in 2017.

Laura Bliss

Why Reform SNAP? Food Aid Is Working

There’s no better tool in the federal government’s anti-poverty arsenal.

Kriston Capps

Could Amazon Flip a State?

Democrats could gain politically if the company chooses a city in a battleground state for its second North American headquarters.

Ronald Brownstein

Why Southern Schools Are Talking Secession

Citing inefficiencies, North Carolina is considering breaking up its countywide school districts. Critics see this as opening the door to resegregation.

Barry Yeoman

A Brief Guide to 'Social Impact Partnerships'

The GOP-led Congress just paved the way for a novel public-private partnership model. But it's not the usual Trump-era legislation.

Kriston Capps


Game On, Amazon

Screenshot from gatehousenews.com/amazon

Gatehouse Media has a power-trip of a city personality quiz: You are Jeff Bezos and you get to pick where HQ2 goes. The game asks you to balance the key interests outlined in Amazon’s Request for Proposal and takes your temperature on hot questions like rent, commuting, or just good food. Take all the economic incentives you want... or not... and find out which of the 20 city finalists best suits your needs. (I got Austin, Texas.)

Reader recap: On Wednesday, the CityLab Daily and MapLab newsletters asked readers to identify the U.S. cities featured in this gif of traffic patterns. Find the answers here. Shoutout to readers James D., Ellen M., and Arnold F. for their correct guesses!


What We’re Reading

For people of color, banks are shutting the door to homeownership (Reveal)

If traffic is a disease, taxes are the cure (Wired)

And now… dockless scooters? (Washington Post)

An app for public comment meetings (Fast Company)

Is the March 5 deadline for DACA meaningful anymore? (NPR)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

  2. Perspective

    Coronavirus Reveals Transit’s True Mission

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

  3. photo: South Korean soldiers attempt to disinfect the sidewalks of Seoul's Gagnam district in response to the spread of COVID-19.
    Coronavirus

    Pandemics Are Also an Urban Planning Problem

    Will COVID-19 change how cities are designed? Michele Acuto of the Connected Cities Lab talks about density, urbanization and pandemic preparation.  

  4. Coronavirus

    The Coronavirus Class Divide in Cities

    Places like New York, Miami and Las Vegas have a higher share of the workforce in jobs with close proximity to others, putting them at greater Covid-19 risk.

  5. A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.
    Equity

    The Geography of Coronavirus

    What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

×