Also today: A portrait of Parkland, Florida, and Seattle is winning the war on the car commute.

A portrait of Parkland: Before Wednesday’s shooting, some families who moved to the Florida suburb looking for safe neighborhoods and top-notch schools considered it “paradise.” CityLab Latino’s Juan Pablo Garnham has the story from the community.

Bikeshare beware: With a smartphones-plus-bikes combination, dockless bikesharing has unlocked a new kind of mobility in American cities. But as you freewheel around town, that technological pairing beams up personal information—your name, payment information, and location—to the system’s operators. That data might roam all the way to China, where dockless companies like Mobike and Ofo are based. CityLab’s Laura Bliss dives into why that data trove is raising eyebrows among cybersecurity and data privacy experts.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Cities: Don’t Just Wait for the Feds

Even after the current occupant of the White House moves on, the federal government will be severely limited in its ability to deal with the nation’s most pressing problems.

Bruce Katz and Jeremy Nowak

How Seattle Is Winning the War on the Car Commute

Despite massive job growth, just 25 percent of workers drove themselves in 2017.

Laura Bliss

Why Reform SNAP? Food Aid Is Working

There’s no better tool in the federal government’s anti-poverty arsenal.

Kriston Capps

Could Amazon Flip a State?

Democrats could gain politically if the company chooses a city in a battleground state for its second North American headquarters.

Ronald Brownstein

Why Southern Schools Are Talking Secession

Citing inefficiencies, North Carolina is considering breaking up its countywide school districts. Critics see this as opening the door to resegregation.

Barry Yeoman

A Brief Guide to 'Social Impact Partnerships'

The GOP-led Congress just paved the way for a novel public-private partnership model. But it's not the usual Trump-era legislation.

Kriston Capps


Game On, Amazon

Screenshot from gatehousenews.com/amazon

Gatehouse Media has a power-trip of a city personality quiz: You are Jeff Bezos and you get to pick where HQ2 goes. The game asks you to balance the key interests outlined in Amazon’s Request for Proposal and takes your temperature on hot questions like rent, commuting, or just good food. Take all the economic incentives you want... or not... and find out which of the 20 city finalists best suits your needs. (I got Austin, Texas.)

Reader recap: On Wednesday, the CityLab Daily and MapLab newsletters asked readers to identify the U.S. cities featured in this gif of traffic patterns. Find the answers here. Shoutout to readers James D., Ellen M., and Arnold F. for their correct guesses!


What We’re Reading

For people of color, banks are shutting the door to homeownership (Reveal)

If traffic is a disease, taxes are the cure (Wired)

And now… dockless scooters? (Washington Post)

An app for public comment meetings (Fast Company)

Is the March 5 deadline for DACA meaningful anymore? (NPR)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of Zurich, Switzerland
    Life

    Death to Livability!

    What does it really mean when certain kinds of cities keep getting ranked as the world’s “most livable”?

  2. A rendering of Quayside, the waterfront development now being planned for Toronto.
    Solutions

    A Big Master Plan for Google's Growing Smart City

    Google sibling company Sidewalk Labs has revealed its master plan for the controversial Quayside waterfront development—and it’s a lot bigger.

  3. a photo of a highway
    Transportation

    Americans Are Spending Billions on Bad Highway Expansions

    PIRG’s annual list of “highway boondoggles” includes nine transportation projects that will cost a total of $25 billion while driving up emissions.

  4. Felipe Rose.
    Life

    A Gay Icon Remembers Life in the Village, and in the Village People

    Fifty years after Stonewall, Felipe Rose—“The Indian” from the Village People—remembers New York City’s Greenwich Village as the gay rights movement took hold.

  5. Design

    Revisiting Pittsburgh’s Era of Big Plans

    A conversation with the trio of authors behind a new book about the Steel City’s mid-20th-century transformation.

×