Also today: A portrait of Parkland, Florida, and Seattle is winning the war on the car commute.

A portrait of Parkland: Before Wednesday’s shooting, some families who moved to the Florida suburb looking for safe neighborhoods and top-notch schools considered it “paradise.” CityLab Latino’s Juan Pablo Garnham has the story from the community.

Bikeshare beware: With a smartphones-plus-bikes combination, dockless bikesharing has unlocked a new kind of mobility in American cities. But as you freewheel around town, that technological pairing beams up personal information—your name, payment information, and location—to the system’s operators. That data might roam all the way to China, where dockless companies like Mobike and Ofo are based. CityLab’s Laura Bliss dives into why that data trove is raising eyebrows among cybersecurity and data privacy experts.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Cities: Don’t Just Wait for the Feds

Even after the current occupant of the White House moves on, the federal government will be severely limited in its ability to deal with the nation’s most pressing problems.

Bruce Katz and Jeremy Nowak

How Seattle Is Winning the War on the Car Commute

Despite massive job growth, just 25 percent of workers drove themselves in 2017.

Laura Bliss

Why Reform SNAP? Food Aid Is Working

There’s no better tool in the federal government’s anti-poverty arsenal.

Kriston Capps

Could Amazon Flip a State?

Democrats could gain politically if the company chooses a city in a battleground state for its second North American headquarters.

Ronald Brownstein

Why Southern Schools Are Talking Secession

Citing inefficiencies, North Carolina is considering breaking up its countywide school districts. Critics see this as opening the door to resegregation.

Barry Yeoman

A Brief Guide to 'Social Impact Partnerships'

The GOP-led Congress just paved the way for a novel public-private partnership model. But it's not the usual Trump-era legislation.

Kriston Capps


Game On, Amazon

Screenshot from gatehousenews.com/amazon

Gatehouse Media has a power-trip of a city personality quiz: You are Jeff Bezos and you get to pick where HQ2 goes. The game asks you to balance the key interests outlined in Amazon’s Request for Proposal and takes your temperature on hot questions like rent, commuting, or just good food. Take all the economic incentives you want... or not... and find out which of the 20 city finalists best suits your needs. (I got Austin, Texas.)

Reader recap: On Wednesday, the CityLab Daily and MapLab newsletters asked readers to identify the U.S. cities featured in this gif of traffic patterns. Find the answers here. Shoutout to readers James D., Ellen M., and Arnold F. for their correct guesses!


What We’re Reading

For people of color, banks are shutting the door to homeownership (Reveal)

If traffic is a disease, taxes are the cure (Wired)

And now… dockless scooters? (Washington Post)

An app for public comment meetings (Fast Company)

Is the March 5 deadline for DACA meaningful anymore? (NPR)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Anti-Amazon graffiti in Long Island City, Queens.
    Equity

    Amazon HQ2 and the ‘Gentrification of Jobs’

    Amazon has said each HQ2 site will result in 25,000 jobs. Will the working-class benefit? Will Amazon train locals for future employment?

  2. The opulent anteroom to a ladies' restroom at the Ohio Theatre, a 1928 movie palace in Columbus, Ohio.
    Design

    The Glamorous, Sexist History of the Women’s Restroom Lounge

    Separate areas with sofas, vanities, and even writing tables used to put the “rest” in women’s restrooms. Why were these spaces built, and why did they vanish?

  3. A photo of an encampment of homeless people outside Minneapolis,
    Equity

    Why Minneapolis Just Made Zoning History

    The ambitious Minneapolis 2040 plan will encourage more dense housing development in single-family neighborhoods.

  4. Passengers line up for a bullet train at a platform in Tokyo Station.
    Transportation

    The Amazing Psychology of Japanese Train Stations

    The nation’s famed mastery of rail travel has been aided by some subtle behavioral tricks.

  5. A photo of the Vianden castle rising above the tree-covered Ardennes hills in northern Luxembourg
    Equity

    Luxembourg’s New Deal: Free Transit and Legal Weed

    It’s not just public transit: The Grand Duchy’s progressive new government also raised the minimum wage and gave everyone two extra days off.