Also today: Preemption comes to dockless bikesharing, and the real cause of the opioid crisis.

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***

What We’re Following

Add to cart: As mayors and city councils court Amazon to bring HQ2 to the heart of their city, we’ve really lost sight of one thing it could deliver: Love. CityLab’s Sarah Holder contemplates where the e-commerce company could cluster tech sector workers, which *sigh* skew male, to complement the distribution of single ladies across the country. In plain English, where could HQ2 help her find a boyfriend?

Here’s some more classic cupid-friendly CityLab content to put in your quiver:

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

A New State Preemption Battlefield: Dockless Bikesharing

Florida lawmakers are weighing a bill that would override a city’s ability to regulate the new private bikesharing companies.

Josh Cohen

The Real Cause of the Opioid Crisis

According to a new study, economic despair is not the primary factor driving abuse of opioids.

Richard Florida

In Toronto, a Likable Space Arrives Underneath a Loathed Expressway

The Bentway only opened last January but hasn’t had trouble drawing people to a previously overlooked spot beneath the Gardiner.

Chris Bateman

Paris Plans a Suburban Forest Five Times the Size of Central Park

A green lung in the city’s northeastern suburbs.

Feargus O'Sullivan

The Promise of Indoor, Hurricane-Proof Vertical Farms

They might be an efficient way to produce food in a world with more-extreme weather—but only if growers can figure out a successful business model.

Meagan Flynn


Map of the Day

Traffic isochrone heartbeat maps by Topi Tjukanov
(Topi Tjukanov)

Eat your heart out gawking at this 24-hour traffic isochrone heartbeat map from Helsinki-based geographer Topi Tjukanov on Twitter. The visualization features pulsing traffic patterns from nine different U.S. cities. Can you guess what they are from just looking at them? Send us your best guesses at hello@citylab.com. (You can check out more of Tjukanov’s geospatial data and visualization work on his portfolio.)


What We’re Reading

So, about what Jeff Sessions had to say about sheriffs… (New Yorker)

The cities where income inequality is the largest and smallest (Axios)

Questions ahead for “opportunity zones” after the tax bill passed (Next City)

Trump’s infrastructure plan would leave small cities behind (Wired)

Space is the place: What Afrofuturism says about urbanism (Curbed)


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