Also today: The attainable wonders of Wakandan transit, and the geography of the U.S. Olympic team.

What We’re Following

Watch the suburbs: If the narrative holds true that the 2018 midterms will be decided in the suburbs, an increased attention on gun policies could push more Republican-held suburban House seats into play. Ronald Brownstein writes that the shifting political geography presents the best opportunity for gun-control advocates since the early 1990s.

Return of the town hall: Vox rounded up the best moments from CNN’s remarkable town hall with parents, teachers, and students from Parkland, Florida, pressuring their elected officials on gun control. What caught our eye: Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel, speaking alongside the NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch, directly criticized the NRA, saying to Loesch:

“I understand you’re standing up for the NRA and I understand that’s what you’re supposed to do. But you just told this group of people that you are standing up for them. You are not standing up for them until you say, ‘I want less weapons.’” (Buzzfeed)

More context:

  • School gun control walkouts are lighting up Snapchat Maps (USA Today)
  • Activists want to keep the gun safety movement student-led (New York Magazine)
  • One Dallas politico tells the NRA to find another town (CityLab)

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

A Powerful Map Promises to Help Cities Keep Streets Free

When a city’s maps don’t match with Uber or Lyft’s, getting precious trip data can be arduous. SharedStreets thinks it can fix that.

Laura Bliss

Court Says Paris's Car Ban Is Illegal

The city vows to fight for its plans to pedestrianize a major thoroughfare along the river Seine.

Feargus O'Sullivan

The Attainable Wonders of Wakandan Transit

Why can’t we have the vibranium-powered passenger trains of the Black Panther universe?

Laura Bliss

The Geography of the U.S. Olympic Team

Despite the specialized nature of winter sports, Team USA in the 2018 Games hails from across the map.

Richard Florida

Socialist Art From China, Remade in Michigan

The artist Wang Qingsong has re-staged a 1959 artwork called “The Bloody Clothes” in Highland Park, a small city within Detroit.

Angie Baecker

Reviving Columbus's 'Dancing C's'

A new branding scheme for the small Indiana city builds off of its reputation for sophisticated modern design.

Teresa Mathew


Room and Board

An image from ' The Rise and Fall of the American SRO'
(Ariel Aberg-Riger/CityLab)

Long before Airbnb and Craigslist, there was Single Room Occupancy housing. CityLab contributor Ariel Aberg-Riger revisits the time when the bed—not the home—was the most basic unit of housing, back in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Her illustration traces the history of how these flexible, fluid, and communal living arrangements that were once popular in booming cities disappeared after World War II.


What We’re Reading

Ikea asks what people want from co-living spaces (Fast Company)

America’s three infrastructure problems (Vox)

Saying ‘treat guns like cars’ overstates how well we regulate cars (Slate)

Fewer Americans are working. Don’t blame immigrants or food stamps (Washington Post)

Extra doorbells, satellite dishes: How cities search for people the census might miss (New York Times)


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