Also today: Density’s next frontier, and why tech companies shouldn’t plan our cities.

What We’re Following

Easy rider: Public transit ridership has declined in most American cities, but the typical death-spiral narrative doesn’t quite fit Los Angeles. What seems to be happening there is that once-loyal lower-income riders, especially immigrants, have switched to cars as the demands of jobs and housing make it more difficult to get by in the famously sprawling city. CityLab’s Laura Bliss has the story.

Shipping and handling: While Amazon HQ2 promises to bring a wave of new jobs to one winning city, the company has long said the same thing would happen in cities that host its fulfillment centers. But according to a new study, the economic benefit from those warehouses—measured by net jobs or raised wages—has yet to be seen.

And don’t miss: The final episode of KUOW’s Prime(d) podcast, a partnership with CityLab, tackles what Amazon’s cloud data means for the future of smart cities and privacy.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Density's Next Frontier: The Suburbs

According to a new study, the continuing low density of inner suburbs is a major cause of the housing crisis—and a potential solution.

Richard Florida

Infrastructure Week Is Always Next Week

President Trump made yet another push for a major bill to rebuild roads, bridges, and railways. But to the frustration of lawmakers, his long-delayed plan is still not ready.

Russell Berman

Tech Companies Should Not Plan Our Cities

The Sidewalk Labs project in Toronto represents a radical departure from the principles that have guided city planning in Canada since Jane Jacobs moved north.

Mariana Valverde

An Incinerator Divides a Town Near Boston

For some, the trash-burning plant is a community pillar, but others worry its toxic ash is making people sick.

Greta Jochem

A Tale of Two State of the Unions

On SOTU night in D.C., crowds at an African-American church and a popular restaurant were unmoved by Trump’s claim to have boosted black employment.

Brentin Mock


Map of the Day

Google News Lab's 'Cuisine Capitals of the U.S.'

Feast your eyes on this very mappy story about the most popular types of restaurants in cities, from Google News Lab. Not only does it show who has the most Mexican restaurants or BBQ joints, it also serves up data on the most visited restaurant type in the neighborhoods of 30 major cities.


What We’re Reading

Dockless bikesharing could clear car clutter from cities (Wired)

In defense of the small city (Slate)

New York’s property tax is theft (Jacobin)

Walkable cities are saving lives (Curbed)

How cities handle events like the Super Bowl (The Guardian)


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About the Author

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