Also today: What’s needed to actually fund infrastructure, and the NRA gets some pushback in Dallas.

What We’re Following

Insufficient funds: Commentators broadly agree that the Trump administration’s recent infrastructure proposal falls short on the federal funding needed for a true overhaul. So what would a real infrastructure revenue stream look like? Harvard scholar and former mayor Stephen Goldsmith writes that a long-term strategy will mean “old taxes and outdated procedures need to change to match a world of new mobility.”

Where kids are in crisis: Witnessing traumatic violence, like the school shooting in Parkland, Florida, is mercifully rare. But childhood trauma, in its many forms, is relatively common in the United States. In fact, almost half of all American children have experienced one potentially traumatic “adverse childhood experience,” according to a new study. Tracking violence in the home or neighborhood, and other personal traumas, the research shows how trauma breaks down by geography and race across the U.S.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Dallas Politico to NRA: Don't Bring Your Guns to Town

The city agreed to waive convention center rental fees to the gun rights group for their annual convention in May. Now one city council member has raised an objection.

Kriston Capps

Airbnb and the Unintended Consequences of 'Disruption'

Tech analysts are prone to predicting utopia or dystopia. They’re worse at imagining the side effects of a firm's success.

Derek Thompson

The Fight for Paid Sick Leave Moves South

Austin just became the first city in Texas to pass an expansive paid sick leave policy, despite state preemption measures that bar them from passing other progressive workers’ rights bills.

Sarah Holder

Mapping the 'Conflict Zones' Between Sprawl and Biodiversity

If cities keep growing as they do now, nearly 400 of them will sprawl into the habitats of endangered species by 2030.

Linda Poon

The U.S. Is Getting Crushed in the Winter Olympics

Meanwhile, smaller nations with cold climates dominate.

Richard Florida

Hire a Refugee (and Pay in Cryptocurrency). What Could Go Wrong?

When technology meets the global refugee crisis, the lines between profit and philanthropy get blurry.

Sarah Holder


Chart of the Day

RENTCafe chart showing renter and homeowner shares in U.S. cities.
RENTCafé

A recent RENTCafé study finds that almost a quarter of the 100 largest U.S. cities have changed from homeowner- to renter-majority from 2006 and 2016. That boosts the total number of renter-dominated big cities to 42—and the chart above shows the top 10. CityLab context: For the first time since 2005, growth in rental housing has experienced a slowdown in the last year.


What We’re Reading

What’s next for Airbnb? (Curbed)

How infrastructure built on inequality (The Guardian)

What wannabe smart cities can learn from ski resorts (Wired)

Pennsylvania’s new congressional district map gives small cities more power (Next City)

What happens when your town ends up on the hate map (Politico Magazine)


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