Also today: Cities can’t fix what’s wrong with American government, and how tax cuts could change the electoral map.

Veni, Vidi, WeWork: With craft beer and cucumber water on tap, settling into the cozy co-working spaces of WeWork feels like “entering the Millennial id.” In the latest issue of The Atlantic, CityLab’s Laura Bliss ponders whether WeWork’s uneasy combination of capitalist ambition and cooperative warmth will become the future of work—and whether the company can really reinvent the office sublet to survive the forces that swept away its predecessors.

Highway to… well? Despite trembles in the stock market, the economy might actually be too strong… for infrastructure, anyway. In FiveThirtyEight, Evan Horowitz writes that the U.S. might have missed the window where infrastructure spending offers the biggest economic boost. “Costly repairs make more sense when the economy is faltering and Americans are desperate for work,” he writes. As unemployment nears a 50-year low, “even a massive infrastructure bill would likely generate only a trivial number of new jobs.” CityLab context: Even so, some places could use infrastructure jobs more than others.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

How Trump's Tax Cuts Could Change the Electoral Map

There’s evidence of a talent shift from cities like New York and L.A. to large Sunbelt metros in red and purple states. But it will do little to ease spatial inequality.

Richard Florida

Cities Alone Can't Fix What's Wrong With American Government

Localism can only flourish with a competent, generous, and fair federal government.

Joe Cortright

The Precarious Existence of London's 'Property Guardians'

A new report calls for bolstering the rights of people who act as live-in security for vacant buildings.

Ella Jessel

How to Fight Gentrification With a Comic Book

To catch the eyes of city officials, St. Paul’s Frogtown neighborhood is launching a small area plan in cartoon form.

Mimi Kirk


Chart of the Day

Statista chart comparing rents across cities.

What can you rent for $1,500 a month? This chart from Statista shows just how much space you’ll get on average in cities around the world. Next time my lease is up, remind me to move to Berlin (139 square meters, or about 1,500 square feet) instead of Manhattan (26 square meters, 280 square feet). Check out this CityLab classic: The hourly wage you need to afford rent in all 50 states.


What We’re Reading

A first look at Apple Park, as seen through employees’ Instagrams (Fast Company)

Homeless. Addicted to heroin. About to give birth. (Mother Jones)

The Trump administration wants to cut environmental review time for road building (USA Today)

A photo tour through the poorest towns in America (Time)

2,500 chemical sites lie in the path of extreme floods (New York Times)


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