People get ready to protest U.S. President Donald Trump's recently unveiled infrastructure plan outside of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C. Leah Millis/Reuters

Also today: How to design "age-friendly" cities and why rural Brits outlive their American counterparts.

What We’re Following

Stop calling it a $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan. It’s not.

Live long and prosper: The “back to the city” movement might conjure images of Millennials moving downtown, but the world’s population is actually aging at the same time that it is urbanizing. In fact, cities are now working to design more “age-friendly” communities, CityLab contributor Mimi Kirk writes. There’s one problem: Efforts so far have largely benefited only affluent households.  

Affluence matters most in determining life spans in the U.S. But not so in the U.K. A recent study finds that rural Brits live longer than their urban peers. They also live longer than rural Americans. What explains the difference? “In the U.K., location is more important for longevity than economic status. But in America, money matters more,” writes Ken Budd for CityLab.

Budget blues: The White House budget proposal released on Monday is just that—a proposal. But if it were to pass as presented, public housing would take a huge hit, CityLab’s Kriston Capps writes. Meanwhile, the contender for the strangest idea might be replacing food stamps with a “Blue Apron-type program,” as budget director Mick Mulvaney put it in a Monday briefing (WaPo). It raises a lot of questions, to say the least.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Uneven Gains of Energy Efficiency

Low-income Americans are more likely to live in housing that wastes energy, which saddles them with disproportionately high energy costs.

Michael Isaac Stein

What's In the Future for Cincinnati's Modernist Icon?

America’s first International Style hotel was designed by a famed architecture firm in its early years and is filled with art by Alexander Calder, Joan Miró, and Saul Steinberg. Now, local preservationists are rallying to give it a secure future.

Lauren Walser

What the Artist Behind Chance the Rapper’s Album Art Is Doing for Chicago

Artist Brandon Breaux had a revelation: He didn’t have to leave Chicago’s South Side to do something extraordinary.

Cara Michell

An Art Show Inspired by the Impact of The Green Book

In “Sanctuary,” Derrick Adams uses history, fashion, and architecture to examine the way black Americans traveled in a period of highway expansion and limited civil rights.

Teresa Mathew

The Algorithm That Can Resettle Refugees

More than 65 million people are living in a state of displacement, the highest level in human history. Only a small fraction are successfully resettled into permanent homes. Is there a digital fix for this very human crisis?

Sarah Holder

In Cities, Coyotes and Foxes Are Learning to Get Along

Researchers say coyotes and foxes thrive in the city by defying their natural instincts to stay away from one another.

Linda Poon

Map of the Day

The urban-rural divide will not be televised, as this map from the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings reveals. Urban and suburban shows are also more often set in real-life localities, while small-town and rural shows are more frequently set in fictional places, Jenny Schuetz notes in her blog post. “Geographic bias in popular culture likely reflects—and contributes to—America’s continued polarization along political, cultural, and social lines,” she writes.

CityLab rerun: Even when sitcoms are set in cities, they still don’t show enough diversity on-screen to pull the urban narrative out of black and white.


What We’re Reading

Graffiti artists awarded $6.7 million for destroyed 5Pointz murals (New York Times)

Facebook’s brewing legal battle with cities and states (Governing)

“It is perhaps the defining feature of someone my age and from my state to have a friend, sibling, or cousin who has died from the opioid crisis” (The Outline)

President Trump’s focus on MS-13 risks bolstering the gang’s reputation (The Guardian)

Why metro Atlanta ramped up immigration enforcement so much (NPR)


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