Also: Loving and fearing Amazon Go, and the selfishness of mapping apps.

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What We’re Following

Walkout 101: It’s been a long time since U.S. students mobilized like they did for Wednesday’s walkout against gun violence, but the scenes were drawing on a powerful history of student-led protest. Fifty years ago, for example, Los Angeles students staged a walkout to demand better treatment of Latino students in their school district. While students across the U.S. were commemorating the Parkland shooting, CityLab’s Teresa Mathew spoke with an activist who was just 17 years old when she helped organize a movement that spread across the city:

“Once the walkouts began, the so-called grownups realized we had taken on issues and actions that they should have been dealing with all along.”

Also: CityLab’s Alastair Boone was out on the scene yesterday to speak with the high school students who came to protest in front of U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Amazon Go Might Kill More Than Just Supermarkets

Supermarkets are community anchors. Amazon’s “just walk out” version embodies a disconcerting social transformation.

Laura Bliss

Why L.A. Just Appointed a Design Czar

Architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne has become the city’s first chief design officer, tasked with making sure the development juggernaut doesn’t get ahead of urban-design principles.  

Benjamin Schneider

On Safari in Youngstown, Ohio

Three years ago, a city councilman wanted to see how far he could drive off the beaten path. That adventure now helps local leaders and advocates survey the remains of the city’s heyday, and find potential for the future.

Scott Sowers

The Perfect Selfishness of Mapping Apps

Apps like Waze, Google Maps, and Apple Maps may make traffic conditions worse in some areas, new research suggests.

Alexis C. Madrigal

Why America's Teachers Haven't Been Getting Raises

It's not just educators in West Virginia and Oklahoma who have watched their wages and benefits erode since the Great Recession.

Annie Lowrey


Game Time

Animated screengrab from Google Maps game.

Cities make great settings for video games, from SimCity to Grand Theft Auto. And now Google wants to play. The search giant is integrating its Google Maps API with the video game engine Unity to bring games into the real world. It will turn the 100 million 3D buildings, roads, landmarks, and parks into game objects that developers can toy around with by adding texture, style, and customization. Now Pokemon Go won’t have a monopoly on games that stroll city blocks. (h/t Fast Company)


What We’re Reading

Philadelphia’s new top prosecutor is rolling out unprecedented reforms (Slate)

An avocado toast dream home Instagram for millennials (Curbed)

Tehran’s mayor watched a dance recital. Now he’s no longer mayor (New York Times)

The National Forests of the future need to be in cities (Fast Company)

TIGER grants are Trump’s program now; most go to highways (Streetsblog)

The case against jaywalking laws (New Republic)


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