Also: Small towns try to tame the Bitcoin boom, and the inequality of venture capital.

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What We’re Following

Who’s counting: The U.S. Commerce Department announced Monday that it will include a citizenship question on the Census for the first time since 1960. Critics worry the change will prompt immigrants, even those in the country legally, to reject the 2020 Census. That could make it more difficult to count residents, with dramatic consequences for apportioning representation and federal funding. CityLab’s Kriston Capps looks at what’s next for the Census.

Pulled over: After last week’s fatal AV crash in Tempe, Arizona, Governor Doug Ducey has suspended Uber from testing its autonomous cars, Fortune reports. Meanwhile, Waymo’s CEO John Krafcik claims their car’s software would have avoided the pedestrian death. (L.A. Times) Watch this space tomorrow for a comprehensive update from CityLab’s Laura Bliss.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Small Towns Try to Tame the Bitcoin Boom

As cryptocurrency miners suck up cheap energy in parts of Washington and New York states, local leaders are scrambling to regulate the industry.

Sarah Holder

'Don't Make Us Go West Virginia On You'

After West Virginia public employees staged a nine-day walkout, workers in other states are preparing to follow the same playbook.

Sarah Holder

The Extreme Geographic Inequality of High-Tech Venture Capital

The rest aren’t rising, and spatial inequality is getting worse.

Richard Florida

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Is Growing

And it was already enormous.

Alastair Boone

Bogotá's Bronx Is Barren, But Not for Long

Once home to crocodile pits where drug dealers disposed of victims, the Bronx in Bogotá awaits an ambitious revitalization and its few remaining residents face an uncertain future.

Lucy Sherriff

Britain's Beautiful Garbage Bins

The wide range of designs U.K. municipalities use for their ubiquitous plastic receptacles are getting their due, thanks to Harry Trimble.

Feargus O'Sullivan


Map of the Day

Library of Congress map showing where Russians were once banned from the U.S.
(Library of Congress)

As 60 Russian officials get expelled from the United States this week, consider this 1957 map produced by the State Department, via the Library of Congress. It shows how, at that time, about a third of the U.S. was off limits to Russian visitors. Among the red patches marking banned travel, the green circles mark the cities where Soviet and Eastern bloc citizens could legally go. So why could Cold War travelers go to Nashville but not Memphis? National Geographic has a theory that the seemingly arbitrary “red lines” may have been a way to hide the conditions of Jim Crow.

CityLab flashback: The U.S.S.R. secretly mapped the entire world.


What We’re Reading

Linda Brown, symbol of landmark desegregation case, dies (New York Times)

Double trouble: How big cities are gentrifying their neighbors (The Guardian)

The real nightmare scenario for driverless cars is… the pop-up ad? (Vox)

Facebook sued for allowing discriminatory housing ads (Curbed)

How Trump favored Texas over Puerto Rico (Politico)


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