Also: L.A. taps the breaks on freeway expansion, and mapping Puerto Rico’s post-hurricane exodus.

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***

What We’re Following

Let’s make a deal: As the National League of Cities meets in Washington, D.C., this week, city leaders are ready to lobby lawmakers for a better infrastructure deal. The delegation says the Trump administration’s proposed 80/20 split on funding is off the table. Instead, mayors are pushing for an equal partnership that would split infrastructure costs 50/50. CityLab’s Sarah Holder dishes out the concrete details from Monday’s NLC presser.

Today at the SXSW Cities Summit: CityLab’s Tanvi Misra joins a panel on gentrification, the Great Migration, and the challenges of improving a neighborhood without driving out the people who made it what it is. Put simply, it asks: “What Happened to our Chocolate Cities?” (3:55 p.m. Central). Come prepared: Check out Brentin Mock’s August story, “The Case for Saving the Small Black City

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

America's Growing 'Guard Labor' Force

Many large urban areas in the U.S. now have more “guard labor” than teachers.

Richard Florida

L.A. Taps the Brakes on Freeway Expansion

After resistance from environmental and community groups, a plan to add lanes to the 710 has been put on hold, but critics remain wary.

Julia Wick

Distressed NYC Homeowners Find Help—From City Hall

Through a special fund, New York City buys up delinquent mortgages to help homeowners and stabilize neighborhoods.

Teresa Mathew

An Artistic Twist on London's Pseudo-Georgian Architecture

A photogenic and tongue-in-cheek look at the commonly reviled design trend that signifies London’s luxury housing boom.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Rising Sea Levels and Sinking Ground Pose a Double Threat to the Bay Area

New research suggests more of the San Francisco area than previously thought could be underwater by 2100.

Matt Simon

Map of the Day

Map of FEMA data showing where Puerto Ricans have moved in the U.S.
(Center for Puerto Rican Studies CUNY/Univision)

Exodus: Six months after Hurricane Maria, more than 135,000 Puerto Ricans have left the island, and it’s estimated that almost half a million people could migrate to the mainland U.S. by 2019.

There’s no single permanent way to get at how many have left, but the City University of New York’s Center for Puerto Rican Studies has found a smart way to map where people are settling: through data from FEMA and school districts throughout the country. CityLab Latino’s Martín Echenique has the story.


What We’re Reading

Police are still killing black people. Why isn’t it news anymore? (Washington Post)

The cities that own the most Bitcoin (Fast Company)

Sculptor of Chicago’s “The Bean” condemns the NRA for putting it in their now-infamous ad (Washington Post)

You can now 3-D print a house in under a day (Quartz)

Las Vegas takes a gamble on a homelessness campus (Governing)

“The trains are slower because they slowed the trains down.” (Village Voice)


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