J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Also: Why is Brooklyn shrinking, and what’s so tough about congestion pricing?

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

All aboard: After threatening to veto a $1.3 trillion spending bill, President Donald Trump went ahead and signed a bill he called “a waste of money.” But for the social safety net, this bill averts doomsday, bringing good news for housing assistance, food aid, and transit. After a year of promising to shred federal spending, many agency budgets went untouched—and some even see a boost in funding. CityLab’s Kriston Capps has the early takeaways on the omnibus package.

Saturday school: Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, will appear tomorrow in Washington, D.C., for the March for Our Lives, a protest against gun violence and a push to make gun laws a key issue in the 2018 election. The students will be joined by thousands more protesters on Pennsylvania Avenue, as well as demonstrations in more than 800 other cities in the U.S. and around the world, mapped here by the New York Times.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Brooklyn Is Booming. So Why Is It Shrinking?

In 2017, New York City’s largest borough lost about 2,000 people, the first net loss since 2010.

Laura Bliss

Forget Broken Windows: Think 'Busy Streets'

This theory suggests neighborhoods can fight crime by getting locals to clean up and maintain their own public spaces.

Marc A Zimmerman

You Want Congestion Pricing? Be Specific.

It’s every wonk’s favorite traffic-relief prescription. But getting road fees right is really complicated.

Eric Goldwyn

In Houston, HUD Assailed for 'Government-Sponsored Segregation'

Advocates in Texas are charging the department with rolling back fair housing laws.

Kriston Capps

Do Art Scenes Really Lead to Gentrification?

A new study finds that arts establishments are actually more concentrated in affluent and gentrified—rather than gentrifying—neighborhoods.

Richard Florida

Have Backyard Chickens Gone Too Free-Range?

Urban-poultry laws need to be stricter about public health and animal welfare, according to one expert.

James Gaines


Bikeshare Everywhere

A picture of shared bikes piled up in China.
(Reuters)

Our colleagues at The Atlantic have a mesmerizing photo essay of the huge piles of abandoned and impounded dockless bikeshare bicycles in China, where the rapidly growing industry overwhelmed cities with a million-bike tsunami of cycles. It may be a wasteful spectacle of capitalism-run-amok, but there’s something psychologically soothing about seeing so many colorful bikes. And it certainly makes the fuss about dockless bikesharing as a sidewalk nuisance in American cities feel insignificant by comparison.


What We’re Reading

What does a presidential building look like? (Curbed)

Four radical real-estate ideas to fix our broken housing system (Fast Company)

What will cities be like when there are more women designing them? (The Cut)

The lose-lose ethics of testing self-driving cars in public (Wired)

A city that makes guns confronts its roles in the Parkland shooting (Washington Post)

How one Houston suburb ended up in a reservoir (New York Times)


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