Also: Mapping the threat of a 2020 Census disaster, and the spaces that can ease childhood trauma.

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***

What We’re Following

Where’s the money? There’s something very odd going on in Pelahatchie, Mississippi. Nine months after Ryshonda Harper Beechem took office as the first African-American mayor of the small town, the Board of Aldermen has decided to cut her pay 75 percent, from $1,000 a month to $250 a month, without prior notice, according to the Clarion-Ledger. The vote comes alongside budget cuts for the shrinking town, and board members voted to cut their own pay, too. But other interferences in Beechem’s ability to act as mayor have many residents and observers wondering if there’s a racial dimension to these actions in the majority-white town.

Toys for NUMTOTs: Maybe you’re a lonely nerd who loves city planning and transit policy, and no one else laughs at your jokes about zoning. Luckily, there’s a place you can go where everybody knows your train. It’s the 62,000-strong Facebook group called New Urbanist Memes for Transit-Oriented Teens, and CityLab’s Laura Bliss has the story of how some college students’ Robert Moses memes turned into “the premier social-media watering hole” for young urban planning wonks.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Mapping the Threat of a Census Disaster in 2020

The GOP seems to be betting that damage from a major undercount will be isolated to Democratic-leaning cities. But it’s not that simple.

Kriston Capps

Trump’s Complaints About Amazon Have a Historical Precedent

The fraught history of government-subsidized package delivery.

Alana Semuels

The Spaces That Can Ease Childhood Trauma

Children’s Advocacy Centers make sure kids only have to tell their story of abuse once.

Mimi Kirk

Census Report Found 'Unprecedented' Fears About Privacy Last Year

Concerns about confidentiality and immigration status were discovered months before the Department of Justice asked to add a question about citizenship.  

Kriston Capps

Here Are the Best and Worst Gifts Given to the Mayor of London

But what happened to the skateboard?

Feargus O'Sullivan


Greetings, Earthlings

Image from Planet Labs
Shanghai, China (Planet Labs)

Typically, satellite images of Earth are flat, which makes for pretty boring photos of cities. But Planet Labs has a Medium post demonstrating how their constellation of satellites get a glance of Earth from another angle. It has beautiful results for natural vertical features like mountains, but it also means seeing urban landscapes, especially with skyscrapers, with a new sense of wonder. The story features eight cities from all over the world—from Houston, Texas, to Osaka, Japan, to São Paulo, Brazil.


What We’re Reading

How Memphis gave up on Dr. King’s dream (New York Times)

The four days in 1968 that reshaped D.C. (Washington Post)

Why are New York taxi drivers killing themselves? (Wired)

What a nuclear bomb would do to your neighborhood, visualized (Fast Company)


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