Also: Trees save megacities tons of money, and experimenting to tackle the opioid crisis.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Reclaim the city: The pioneering Danish architect, urbanist, and planner Jan Gehl helped transform Copenhagen into one of the world’s most bike-, people-, and climate-friendly cities. In an interview with CityLab, Gehl describes how studying public space turned the city into a laboratory, and how to be systematic about caring for people:

What we have done in Copenhagen is to make the people who use the city visible and to document what is going on: Where people go, how many there are, how long they sit on benches, how many café chairs we have. We do all this every year, just as if we were traffic engineers. Now the politicians have all the information about the life of the city. Then we can ask them to make their choice.

But he warns planners of the allure of smart cities: “Whenever you hear the word ‘smart,’ beware.”

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Here's How Much Money Trees Save in Megacities

Trees’ benefits come out to a median value of $967,000 per square kilometer of tree cover, researchers estimate.

Theodore Endreny

Free Shipping Isn't Hurting Amazon

Sending packages is expensive. But the retailer isn’t afraid to spend.

Alana Semuels

Gird Yourself for the Latest Infuriating Nordic Life Hack

It’s called sisu, and it’s Finnish for fortitude. But it probably won’t work on you.

Feargus O'Sullivan

A Drone's Eye View of Spain's Housing Bubble

“We need to remember these places, what we did here and what we should learn for the future,” says photographer Markel Redondo. “We need to know that these buildings are still there.”

Juan Pablo Garnham

'Kelo' Goes to Hollywood

The new movie Little Pink House dramatizes the Supreme Court decision that changed the way Americans saw eminent domain.

Anthony Flint


Who’s Counting

Map of opioid stat miscounts
(Esri)

There’s more to America’s opioid epidemic than death statistics—and even those can be unreliable. The map above shows just how much states may undercount their opioid death rates. The dark shades represent the biggest difference between reported opioid mortality rates in 2014 and corrected rates based on analysis from the University of Virginia.

As those numbers lag, cities and towns are on the front lines of an opioid crisis they don’t fully understand. Some are getting creative with how to gather more data on the problem: One city even has a plan to mine drug-usage data from its sewage. CityLab’s Linda Poon has the story on the experimental, data-driven quest to learn what’s really happening in the opioid crisis.


What We’re Reading

One of Amazon’s HQ2 goals: Learn the lessons of Seattle (New York Times)

Two San Francisco Chronicle reporters are riding every Muni line today (San Francisco Chronicle)

Can cities make us better citizens? (New Yorker)

Velib, Paris’s famed bikeshare program, is in trouble (Wall Street Journal)

Why it has become so easy to hide in the housing market (New York Times)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Stella Bowles stands on a riverbank.
    Environment

    How One Kid Stopped the Contamination of a River

    To halt the illegal flow of raw sewage into Nova Scotia’s LaHave River, it took a determined 11-year-old with water samples and a Facebook page.

  2. Life

    I Delivered Packages for Amazon and It Was a Nightmare

    Amazon Flex pays drivers to deliver packages from their own vehicles. But is it a good deal for workers?

  3. The collapsed Morandi Bridge in the Italian city of Genoa.
    Transportation

    What Brought Down This Bridge in Genoa?

    The disaster has focused attention on the state of infrastructure built during the nation’s postwar boom.

  4. Illustration of a house with separate activities taking place in different rooms.
    POV

    The Case for Rooms

    It’s time to end the tyranny of open-concept interior design.

  5. Design

    Here Comes Amsterdam’s Man-Made Island for Sustainable, Affordable Housing

    Centrumeiland will soon hold hundreds of affordable homes with the lightest of possible carbon footprints.