Also: Uber pivots to on-demand everything, and mapping the teacher pay gap.

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***

What We’re Following

Redlining persists: Today marks 50 years since Congress passed the Fair Housing Act in an effort to uproot redlining and other banking practices that fueled racial segregation. But those challenges still remain: African Americans and Latinos continue to be denied mortgages at far higher rates than whites in 61 metro areas.

Using the data from Reveal and other sources, CityLab has visualized how that discrimination manifests itself in two of those cities—Jacksonville, Florida, and St. Louis, Missouri—where maps of mortgage approvals and home values in black neighborhoods look the same as they did decades ago. CityLab’s Kriston Capps and Kate Rabinowitz report: How the Fair Housing Act Failed Black Homeowners.

Might as well Jump: Uber’s purchase of Jump, a dockless bikeshare company, could be one small step toward a giant leap. CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is in Washington, D.C., today to launch the app integration, and the company isn’t stopping there: It also announced that users will soon be able to use the Uber app to find peer-to-peer shared cars, and to purchase passes for public transit. That all suggests that the ubiquitous ride-hailing app might prefer a broader definition: “mobility as a service.” CityLab’s Laura Bliss has the story.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

It's Time to Acknowledge That the Housing Crisis Is Global

Scarce, unaffordable housing is not a local problem in a few places, but is baked into the 21st-century global city. It’s time for cities, nations, and global leaders to start acting like it.

Richard Florida and Benjamin Schneider

Mapping the Great American Teacher Pay Gap

While the public employee walkouts started with West Virginia, many other U.S. states pay teachers far less than other college-educated professionals—often much less.

Sarah Holder

How a Black Reporter Covered D.C. in 1968

At 21, Jack White was one of only a handful of African-American journalists working in the mainstream Washington media when the city erupted after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

Marilyn Milloy

London's Congestion Charge Needs Updating

After 15 years of existence, London’s method of congestion charging is dated. It needs to be bigger, longer, and greedier.

Nicole Badstuber

Why One Chicago Neighborhood Has to Keep Fighting Off Polluters

In 2012, Little Village’s Hispanic residents helped shut down a coal plant. Now, a redevelopment company plans to build a distribution center—and a lot of truck traffic—into the neighborhood.

Sophie Yeo


The Other Side of MLK Boulevard

Community organizer John Comer reflects on the problems faced by the black communities in West Baltimore in front of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard.
Community organizer John Comer reflects on the problems faced by the black communities in West Baltimore in front of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard. (Tanvi Misra/CityLab)

Baltimore’s Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard follows a pattern seen in many cities: Streets named for the slain civil rights icon tend to be poor and segregated, signaling King’s unfulfilled dream for America. But the street is not just a symbol. It functions as a real, physical barrier between the mostly black residents in West Baltimore and the economic activity in the central spine of the city. In collaboration with NPR’s “Codeswitch” as part of our Cities on Fire 1968 series, CityLab’s Tanvi Misra digs into how the road that brought suburbanites downtown also made the Baltimore’s segregation harder to undo.

Extra: Don’t miss the CityLab crew on this week’s episode of “Codeswitch,” where Tanvi discusses her Baltimore story and Brentin Mock talks about his recent reporting on Atlanta’s cityhood movement. Listen here.


What We’re Reading

Why buying a house today is so much harder than in 1950 (Curbed)

Bringing solar power to affordable housing in Brooklyn (Next City)

This Sim City-style tool lets urban planners see the potential impact of their ideas (Fast Company)

Miami’s proposal to teacher’s money problems: let them live at school (Governing)

Facebook stores its data in this rural North Carolina town, where the privacy debate is just beginning to catch on (Washington Post)


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