Also: Where YIMBYs can win, and what Detroit’s growth means for its suburbs.

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What We’re Following

HUD piles on the bills: A new bill backed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development would raise rents for housing aid recipients, and could let public-housing authorities and landlords set work requirements for their tenants. HUD Secretary Ben Carson says the goal is to relieve lengthy waitlists for housing aid and to incentivize “self-sufficiency,” but the proposal has alarmed housing experts. CityLab’s Kriston Capps explains what this means in his story: Why HUD Wants to Raise the Rent

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Where the YIMBYs Can Win

The defeat of SB 827, California’s ambitious pro-housing bill, masks a wider trend: Similar initiatives are on the march nationwide.

Nolan Gray

Can Detroit's Suburbs Survive a Downtown Revival?

The city is experiencing a sustained real estate boom, poaching employers—even pro sports teams—from surrounding municipalities. Places like Southfield, Pontiac, and Dearborn will have to find ways to keep up.

Amy Crawford

Fixing Infrastructure When the Feds Won't Help

Local transportation and utility projects could sure use federal assistance. But these mayors are going it alone.

John Surico

America's Justice System Has the Wrong Goals

Two former prosecutors argue that we need a justice system that values a breadth of solutions rather than one that rewards incarceration financially and professionally.

Lauren-Brooke Eisen and Miriam Aroni Krinsky

After Van Attack, Toronto Balances Grief and Resolve

A city that has long prized diversity is grappling with new security fears after Monday’s vehicle attack that killed 10 pedestrians.

Chris Bateman


Map of the Day

Urban Institute map of overall inclusion in U.S. cities
(Urban Institute)

Economic growth doesn’t necessarily go hand-in-hand with economic and racial inclusion. That’s the finding of a new in-depth Urban Institute analysis of the 274 largest cities in America. The study measures economic growth from 1980 to 2013 alongside measures of economic health and racial disparities to rank inclusive and recovering cities. CityLab’s Tanvi Misra digs into the report’s takeaways from successful cities that improved inclusion as they grew.

The report’s top 10 cities for overall inclusion tended to be mid-sized cities in California—from Fremont to Santa Clara to Carlsbad—with Bellevue, Washington, and Naperville, Illinois, also ranking high. Meanwhile, bigger cities landed in the bottom ranks, with Dallas, Houston, Phoenix, Atlanta, and Miami all performing poorly on overall inclusion.


What We’re Reading

This app declares war on loud restaurants (Vox)

How to not be a bully behind the wheel (Streetsblog)

Redlining has taken a huge toll on property values. But not everywhere. (Slate)

How ICE mines local police databases (In Justice Today)

A portrait of the South, served up one Waffle House order at a time (The New York Times)


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