Also: Americans are self-sorting by class, and Chicago and Houston fight over beans.

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What We’re Following

Rebuild or rethink? Three weeks after a pedestrian bridge collapsed over a busy street near Florida International University, killing six motorists, many questions remain about what went wrong. But there’s a deeper issue, too: Was a 174-foot bridge over eight lanes of traffic ever the best solution?

CityLab Latino editor Juan Pablo Garnham takes a look at one proposed street redesign that would rebalance the priority given to walking, biking, transit, and cars at the ground level. It looks a little something like this:

Animation of a reimagined Eighth Street
(Dover, Kohl & Partners)

So long, infrastructure week: The departure of White House infrastructure adviser D.J. Gribbin confirms what we already knew: There’s no real push for an infrastructure plan. (Vox)

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Americans Are Geographically Self-Sorting Themselves by Class

Socioeconomic sorting at the metropolitan level is making America more polarized, an economist finds.

Richard Florida

Florida Cities Ramp Up the Fight to Regulate Their Own Guns

After the Parkland shooting, cities wanted to control gun use in their communities, only to be stalled by harsh preemption laws. Now, they're suing the state.  

Sarah Holder

Chicago to Houston: 'Your Bean Is Wack'

Houston is creeping on Chicago's population, pennants, and now, public art. But Chicago has at least one thing Houston still lacks.

Kriston Capps

A Golf Institution Sets Its Sights On the Neighbors

Augusta National has gobbled up about 100 acres outside its storied gates. What’s the plan? A spokesperson for the famously secretive club will only say that off-campus property “supports tournament operations.”

Jolee Edmondson

What If Venice's Massive New Flood Gate Doesn't Work?

Finally, construction is finishing on the delayed barrier to protect the city from high tides.

Marcello Rossi


Tipping Point

Chart analyzing tips from Lyft riders.
(Stephen Cognetta/Hacker Noon)

In a ride-hailing mini-experiment, a former Lyft driver catalogued which riders tipped, and which ones didn’t. Stephen Cognetta, a former product manager at Google, compared trip tips on 50 different Lyft rides in the Denver area, logging variables such as start and end times, number of passengers, gender, ride mode, and whether a conversation occurred. Cognetta found only two statistically significant findings: Chatty customers were more likely to tip, and not a single Lyft Line passenger passed the cost savings on to Cognetta via tips. It’s behavior to consider as places like Manhattan tack a congestion tax on ride hailing trips. (Next City)


What We’re Reading

An app-driven frenzy on one of L.A.'s steepest streets (Los Angeles Times)

Why cities should just annex the suburbs (The Week)

Collective ignorance about the Rust Belt is getting dangerous (Time)

Is the Post Office making or losing money delivering Amazon packages? (Washington Post)

Wow. Look at these astounding photos of abandoned dockless vehicles in America. (Slate)


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