Also: How to speak bikeshare, and the case of a black mayor’s 75% pay cut.

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What We’re Following

Toronto attack: Monday’s sidewalk attack in Toronto follows a pattern of vehicular terror that further demonstrates how traffic threatens lives, and the need for safe streets. As CityLab’s Laura Bliss wrote after a truck driver plowed through a New York bike path in October, vehicle attacks don’t have to be inevitable:

Not every street will ever be lined with concrete barriers, and in a crowded city, all vehicles can be weaponized, intentionally or not. … Banning cars and trucks [from pedestrian-heavy areas] would not only make acts of vehicular terror far harder to execute, it would ease the quotidian bloodshed of fatal crashes. And then, those walking and riding through their cities would actually be safer, instead of just feeling that way.

What’s your password? Atlanta’s ransomware attackers demanded about $50,000. The aftermath has cost the city more than $2.6 million, Wired reports. It’s possible that city officials never even had a chance to pay the ransom after the attackers took the payment portal offline, but the expenses, ranging from tech consulting to crisis communication services, have proved far more costly. CityLab context: The Atlanta cyberattack could have been much worse.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

What Cities Need to Understand About Bikeshare Now

Public or private? Docked or dockless? E-bike or e-scooter? It’s complicated. But bikesharing is now big business, and cities need to understand how these emerging systems operate—and who operates them.

Alex Baca

The Strange Case of a Black Mayor's 75% Pay Cut

In Pelahatchie, a small Mississippi city, the town’s first black mayor struggles to exert control.

Ko Asha Bragg

Can We All Get Along?

Being a city dweller in an increasingly urbanized world will mean learning how to share space with very different people, says planner and urban scholar Richard Sennett.

Ian Klaus

London's Latest Exhibit: Horrendous Pollution

An exhibit invites the public to experience the air from five cities around the world.

Feargus O'Sullivan

A Pennsylvania Town Finds a Way to Save Its 'Other' Train Station

Lansdale’s freight station is just as old as the beloved passenger station nearby. Volunteers are making sure it’ll no longer be an “ignored stepchild.”

Nicholas Som

Dutch Cities Don't Love Weed

The Hague’s new ban on the public consumption is the latest signal of the country’s waning tolerance. It could also be a step toward a happier medium.

Feargus O'Sullivan


Map of the Day

Screenshot from All the Buildings in Manhattan
Types of residential buildings in the Upper East Side and Harlem. (Taylor Baldwin)

Mapped in Manhattan: Open data does it again. This new interactive map of all the buildings in Manhattan, created by software engineer Taylor Baldwin, combines the city’s publicly available 3-D building models and PLUTO tax lot data to sort the borough’s buildings by age, building height, or residential building class.

It’s a little clunky (best viewed in Chrome on desktop), but that last option is worth the load time, turning the city’s residential zoning into a Fruity Pebbles array of walk-ups, condos, hotels, and more. (h/t Curbed NY)


What We’re Reading

Amazon wants to drop its junk off in your trunk (The Verge)

A new kind of city tour shows the history of racist housing policies (Fast Company)

Traffic safety data company finds more drivers using cell phones (Streetsblog)

“Architecture fiction” is the design world’s clickbait (Quartz)

Sean Hannity is just another corporate landlord (Slate)


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