Also: What Arizona teachers are still fighting for, and Mexico City’s wild new airport.

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What We’re Following

Peace train: As the U.S. prepares for talks with North Korea, nuclear weapons are getting all the headlines. But the key to lasting peace could be all about infrastructure. Last month, South Korea’s Moon Jae-in handed North Korea’s Kim Jong Un a plan to re-link their railways—and it’s pretty politically savvy. This olive branch, if it came to pass, would connect North Korea’s cities to the global economy, and maybe even be a precursor to a Trans-Eurasian train ride from Tokyo to London. With benefits for both countries and their neighbors, the plan could make President Donald Trump’s upcoming meeting with the isolated dictator a lot easier. Today on CityLab: Trains could be the real game-changer in the North Korea peace talks.

HBD, Jane: May the Fourth, Cinco De Mayo, the Kentucky Derby—whatever you’re celebrating this weekend, don’t forget the real urbanist holiday this May: It’s Jane Jacobs’ birthday! Here’s a present from the archives: CityLab’s Laura Bliss revisits Jacobs, in her own words.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

What Arizona Teachers Are Still Fighting For

The six-day walkout of the state’s public school teachers wasn’t just about paychecks, says one Glendale teacher.

Sarah Holder

Critics Take Aim at Mexico City's Wild New Airport

It will become the biggest airport in the Western Hemisphere by 2020. But not without overcoming some heavy turbulence.

Martín Echenique

Wakanda, New Davonhaime: The Yearning for a New Black City

A roving installation by artist Azikiwe Mohammed stops at the Contemporary African Art Fair in Brooklyn to offer a “safe space” for black bodies.

Teresa Mathew

How Gentrification Affected Philadelphia's Homeowners

Tax delinquency rates rose with jumps in tax burdens, but relief programs for some owners helped mitigate the effect.

Tanvi Misra

In the Netflix Era, a Video Store Becomes a Cultural Asset

When streaming upended the industry, Seattle’s Scarecrow Video reimagined itself as a community hub and keeper of an archive that can’t be matched online.

Hallie Golden


Grow on Trees

Chart: Trees needed to offset emissions from various forms of travel

Lyft announced last month that it will buy carbon offsets for its 2 million daily rides. That news yielded a curious chart from our colleagues over at Quartz: How many trees would need to be planted to offset different modes of transportation each year?

Biking and walking, of course, require no trees, but the numbers climb quickly after that. The case to be made about cars (using data supplied by Uber, mind you) is that single-occupancy vehicles are worse than carpooling. Just compare three people sharing a car (26 trees) to a single person driving their car all year (81 trees). But don’t be a deadhead: Ride hailing isn’t eco-friendly yet.


What We’re Reading

What kids and seniors understand about scooters (Curbed)

A third of European cities still don’t care about climate change (Quartz)

Should supply and demand determine the price for a fast commute? (Wall Street Journal)

The classic British pub is trying to survive challenging times (TIME)

How California’s housing crisis might lead to an economic one (Curbed)


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