Could be worse. Carlo Allegri/Reuters

Also: How to kill a bike lane, and college grads drive up urban rents.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Hauling fast: The disarray of Gotham’s subway has dominated headlines and local politics, but the plight of the city’s buses has been a much quieter fight. New York City’s buses are now the slowest in America. In late April, Metropolitan Transit Authority announced an ambitious overhaul of the 322-route bus system that has transit advocates giddy. With promises of bus priority planning, cashless payments, and even a pilot program of London-style double decker buses, it’s literally what advocates were asking for. But is it too good to be true? Read How Riders Won the Fight for Better Buses in New York City on CityLab, the latest in our ongoing series, Bus to the Future.

New sheriff in town: On Tuesday, we told you about the sheriff’s race in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. We have an update: Incumbent Sheriff Irwin Carmichael’s opponent Garry McFadden won 52 percent of the vote Tuesday night, becoming the new sheriff on a pledge to revoke the controversial immigration program that Carmichael had carried out.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

How to Kill a Bike Lane

In cities nationwide, efforts to redesign streets for bikes and pedestrians can face stiff resistance.

Matt Tinoco

How College Grads Drive Up Urban Rents

In cities that gain college graduates, wages rise but so do rents, resulting in a cost burden for the least advantaged.

Richard Florida

Mexico City Looks for New Ways to Tame Air Pollution

The city has made strides in clearing up its notorious smog, but progress has stalled in recent years.

Natalie Schachar

'Love Doesn't Have to Be in Your Backyard'

In cities with small Jewish communities, finding a partner who shares religious values can seem impossible. These jet-setting matchmakers work to overcome that geographic barrier.

Sarah Treleaven

A Theater's Long Fight to Find a Home in Manhattan

New York City crafted a plan to help artists stay in the pricey Theater District as its property values surge. But one group’s saga shows that getting a rule on the books is just the first step.

Teresa Mathew

Crackdown, charted

Our colleagues over at Quartz plotted out where arrests by Immigration and Customs Enforcement have increased the most during the Trump administration, based on where immigrants live. Using data from a new study by the Migration Policy Institute, they find that the field offices of Miami, Dallas, and St. Paul have seen a bigger increase in arrests than the rest of the country, while San Francisco, Houston, and San Antonio, which have the characteristics of “sanctuary cities,” have seen a smaller increase than the national average. The share of transfers from local jails to ICE has shrunk from previous years—but according to MPI, that’s because federal immigration officials have increased the number of arrests they make themselves. CityLab context: The effect of Trump’s immigration crackdown, in 3 maps


What We’re Reading

The epic struggle for the Los Angeles River (Places Journal)

Uber’s quest to redesign its toxic relationship with its drivers (Fast Company)

Millennials are driving again, just not the rich ones (Slate)

Can you guess the city from the literary quote? (The Guardian)

How small towns aren’t just surviving, they’re thriving (Curbed)

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