Also: Parking spaces for women, and London’s big push for better design.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Come to your census: For the first time in a decade, New York City was not the leader in total population growth, according to Census population estimates released Thursday. As more people move out of New York and Los Angeles—the high cost of housing seems to be sapping growth along the coasts—it’s harder for those cities to maintain growth through births and immigration alone (Pew Charitable Trusts). San Antonio and Phoenix lead the pack in total population increase: Both added about 24,000 people between 2016 and 2017. Some of the largest population declines were in Baltimore, St. Louis, Chicago, Anchorage, and Pittsburgh—netting losses between 2,600 and 5,000 in total population over the year.

Proportionately, though, the fastest growing cities are actually just big suburbs rather than true cities. Jed Kolko, an economist at Indeed, points out that the largest increases in cities with more than 200,000 people were places such as Irvine, California; Henderson, Nevada; Atlanta, Georgia; and Tampa, Florida; which are all areas with less than 50 percent of what he defines as urban space (places with 2,200 households per square mile). So if you’re looking for the fastest growing actual city, it’s Seattle. (Quartz)

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Mapping the Segregation of Metro Atlanta’s Amenities

A new mapping project shows how segregation is a matter of whether you have close access to a grocery store, hospital, bank, or park—amenities that influence your quality of life.

Brentin Mock

As Michigan’s Municipal Water Crisis Drags on, Its Bottled Water Industry Booms

Nestlé pays the state a pittance in exchange for its water at a time when public awareness of water issues is rising.

Nicholas Schroeck

London’s Big Push for Better Design

The city's Public Practice program is embedding experienced architects and planners around the area in an effort to speed housing construction and get more inclusive public spaces.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Madrid Takes Its Car Ban to the Next Level

Starting in November, the city will make clear that downtown streets are not for drivers.

Feargus O'Sullivan

What’s Up With Seoul’s Pink Parking Spaces for Women?

They’re like regular parking spaces. Except, you know, pink.

Melissa Loveridge


The X-Factor

Mural of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King
Camilo José Vergara

The civil rights icon Malcolm X would have turned 93 years old last weekend. Murals of the Muslim minister were once popular among communities in Chicago, Detroit, Oakland, and Los Angeles, as pictured above. But as buildings have been painted over, demolished, or collapsed, his portraits have faded into the background (sometimes literally). Photographer Camilo José Vergara shares some rare photos of America’s disappearing Malcolm X murals on CityLab.


What We’re Reading

Emergency braking system was disabled on self-driving Uber in fatal crash, NTSB says (Los Angeles Times)

How the municipal court money machine burdens city residents (Curbed)

Architects can still learn from Tom Wolfe (The Architect’s Newspaper)

The activist who brought us the curb cut (99 Percent Invisible)

Teaching refugees to map their world (Fast Company)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Equity

    Yes, 311 Nuisance Calls Are Climbing in Gentrifying Neighborhoods

    A new analysis by the Science vs. podcast team crunches the numbers on which New York City blocks are seeing spikes in calls complaining about other residents.

  2. Transportation

    How Toronto Turned an Airport Rail Failure Into a Commuter Asset

    The Union Pearson Express launched with expensive rides and low ridership. Now, with fares slashed in half and a light rail connection in the works, it’s a legitimate transit alternative for workers.

  3. Equity

    The Nursing Home That's Also a Dorm

    More retirement and nursing homes are asking college students to move in, an arrangement that benefits everyone.

  4. Slogan projected on the Eiffel Tower for World Climate Change Conference
    Environment

    What Local Climate Actions Would Have the Greatest Impact

    In light of even more dire news about our warming planet, leading thinkers tell us the one thing cities and states could do to cut emissions significantly—and fast.

  5. Transportation

    Japan Keeps This Train Station Running for Just One Regular Passenger

    Trains here make only a few stops—when a lone high-school student leaves for school, and when class is over.