Also: The jobs getting priced out of superstar cities, and America’s fastest-growing metro region has a water problem.

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What We’re Following

Rollback: Northwest Arkansas might not be the kind of place where you’d expect a bike renaissance, but it now boasts an impressive 350-mile network of bicycle infrastructure—thanks, in part, to Walmart. In the backyard of the company’s headquarters in Bentonville, a mix of federal transportation grants and support from the Walton Family Foundation, led by the heirs of Walmart’s founders, has helped boost cycling volume 32 percent from 2015 to 2017.

Now they’re finding that some of the most-used trails have higher per capita daily cycling counts than some of the biggest bike-friendly cities, including San Francisco, and that bike amenities are bringing in economic benefits to the region of smaller communities. Erica Sweeney has the story for CityLab: How Arkansas Became Bike Country.

  • What a piece of work: In many U.S. cities, today is Bike To Work Day. But now that cities have learned to love the bike commute, they need to forget it and focus on making all those other common everyday trips safer. Here’s my hit-the-brakes take: Don’t Get Too Excited About Bike To Work Day.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

America's Fastest-Growing Urban Area Has a Water Problem

As St. George, Utah grows, it will have to cut down on its high water consumption or pay handsomely for it—or both.

Jake Bullinger

Is Washington Big Enough for Two Tech Giants?

Both Amazon and Apple have expressed interest in developing new campuses in the D.C. metro area. Can they both actually fit?

Sarah Holder

The Deal That Might Just Break Georgia Into Pieces

This would be the de-gentrification of the city of Stockbridge, with its wealthy areas carved away for a new city while remaining residents pick up the substantial tab left behind.

Brentin Mock

The Jobs That Are Getting Priced Out of Superstar Cities

It’s not high costs alone that are pushing people out of expensive cities—whole categories of jobs are underrepresented there.

Richard Florida

Estonia Will Roll Out Free Public Transit Nationwide

Meet the new world leader in fare-free living.

Feargus O'Sullivan


Late Rent

Animated chart showing the shifting age profiles of American homeownership.

The chart above from economist Gray Kimbrough measures the shifting age profiles of Americans who live in a home that is owned (rather than rented) over the decades. Follow the x-axis and you’ll see the dip around age 20 when kids get pushed out of the nest, no matter what era. But that climb back to homeownership came at a younger age for the 1980 and 2000 cohorts, whereas Millennials today make a smaller share of homeowners than their 1960s counterparts. CityLab context: “Peak Millennial” doesn’t mean young people are leaving cities


What We’re Reading

Wind and solar power are coming. Grid managers need to get ready (Vox)

Scooters are fine, but look out for “the invasion of the scooter bros” (Washington Post)

Elon Musk presents his tunnel vision to Los Angeles (Wired)

Bitcoin’s energy use got studied, and it’s really not pretty (Grist)

Lawns are an ecological disaster (Earther)


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