Also: The rise of the rural creative class, and Kanye wants to develop cities.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

No streetcar, no desire: Nashville’s $5.2 billion transit referendum went down in flames Tuesday night. The “Let’s Move Nashville” plan showed promise at first, when former Mayor Megan Barry secured rare support from the state legislature to hold the vote. But her resignation in disgrace this March left little time to make the case to a car-dependent city in a conservative Southern state. (And as we wrote last week, the campaign got weird.)

With a special mayoral election coming in three weeks, supporters, opponents, and would-be mayors are sure to perform a full autopsy on the transit plan. But as CityLab’s Kriston Capps writes: “In the end, a vision for transforming transit in Nashville could not transform the politics of the city.” Read the full story: What Went Wrong With Nashville’s Transit Plan?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Rise of the Rural Creative Class

A growing body of research shows that innovative businesses are common in rural areas, and rural innovation gets a boost from the arts.

Richard Florida

Kanye West Wants to Develop Cities. Don't Let Him.

"I’m going to be one of the biggest real estate developers of all time," he said.

Brentin Mock

France Plans an Extreme Makeover for Struggling Small Cities

Action Coeur de Ville aims to undo the damage of urban sprawl in more than 200 city centers across the country.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Is America Ready to Rethink Incarceration?

A new poll suggests that most people in the United States think we need to turn away from building prisons, and toward community development.

Teresa Mathew

Venice Erects Gates Against a Flood of Tourists

Don’t have a local transit pass? Then you’re not coming through.

Feargus O'Sullivan


Map of the Day

AAA map of fatal hit-and-run crashes per capita.
Fatal hit-and-run crashes per 100,000 people from 2010 to 2016. (AAA)

Fatalities from hit-and-run crashes have reached an all-time high, according to a new report from AAA. In 2016, 2,049 deaths resulted from hit-and-run crashes. On a per-capita basis, New Mexico, Louisiana, and Florida top the list, while New Hampshire, Maine, and Minnesota have the lowest rates, as the map above shows. Pedestrians account for the majority of people killed in these types of crashes, and over the past 30 years, about 1 in 5 pedestrian deaths involve a hit-and-run crash. CityLab context: U.S. road fatalities climb while road safety laws lag


What We’re Reading

Amazon’s phone calls to rejected HQ2 cities: “It’s not me. It’s you.” (Wall Street Journal)

“The Daily” podcast tackles the plight of the NYC taxi driver (New York Times)

Why are New York’s schools segregated? It’s not as simple as housing (New York Times)

The new magnetism of mid-sized cities (Curbed)

You’re no “climate mayor” if you’re not doing these four things (Streetsblog)

Correcting a link from yesterday: Kalamazoo’s bet on philanthropy raises hopes—and suspicions (The Chronicle of Philanthropy)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Two men plant a young tree in a lot in Detroit.
    Environment

    Why Detroit Residents Pushed Back Against Tree-Planting

    Detroiters were refusing city-sponsored “free trees.” A researcher found out the problem: She was the first person to ask them if they wanted them.

  2. A man carrying a young boy on his shoulders amid the fall foliage of New York's Central Park.
    Life

    Which U.S. Cities Have the Most Families With Kids?

    Spoiler alert: It’s simply not the case that families with kids have disappeared from urban America.

  3. A photo of President Donald Trump showing off U.S.-Mexico border wall prototypes in March 2018.
    Perspective

    Like Confederate Monuments, Trump’s Border Wall Is Really About Racism

    The president’s vision of a massive wall along the Mexican border is fundamentally about propaganda and oppression, not national security.

  4. Equity

    Hope You Aren't Counting on Getting a Tax Refund This Winter

    Millions of low-income households rely on the Earned Income Tax Credit to help them get through the winter. Too bad most IRS workers are furloughed.

  5. A bike path surrounded by trees facing a river and the Quebec City skyline
    Environment

    Quebec City’s Disappearing Agricultural Land

    As agricultural areas are snatched up and transformed into new housing developments, one farmer keeps fighting.