Also: Who owns LOVE? And reverse migration might turn Georgia blue.

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What We’re Following

Same diff: Pundits may have exhausted nearly every “urban-rural divide” explanation for the gulf revealed by the 2016 election. But a new survey by the Pew Research Center finds we might not be so different after all. While place can predict people’s political leanings, the everyday problems of urban dwellers and rural residents look a lot alike—from the opioid crisis to the economy.

What’s more surprising is how similarly people feel about where they live. No matter if respondents reside in a big city or a small town, they report the same tenuous connection to their community, the same unfamiliarity with their neighbors, and the same emo belief that they’re misunderstood. CityLab’s Tanvi Misra covers the brooding findings from this survey of a moody America: Rural and Urban America Have More In Common Than You Think

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Who Owns LOVE?

Just days before Robert Indiana’s death, an offshore shell company filed a copyright suit against him over his beloved public artwork.

Kriston Capps

The ‘Barefoot Doctors’ Serving America's Cities

Since it took root in the U.S. during the Gold Rush, Chinese medicine has served marginalized communities, from immigrants to Black Panthers to sex workers.

Mary Wang

Reverse Migration Might Turn Georgia Blue

More black people from the Northeast and Midwest are moving to Atlanta. That could help elect the nation’s first black female governor.

Alana Semuels

Arne Duncan Is Very Serious About a Massive School Boycott

The former education secretary thinks parents need to take radical action on gun laws.

Adam Harris

This Estonian Town Just Made the Cannabis Leaf its New Logo

Kanepi, Estonia’s new symbol is pretty dope.

Feargus O'Sullivan


The Kids Are All Bike

LimeBikes pictured in parking spaces.
(Matthew Bennett)

It’s graduation season, and that means it’s time for senior pranks—dockless edition. In Rockford, Illinois, seniors graduating from East High School deployed dozens of LimeBikes under the cover of night to fill their school’s parking lot with the dockless shared bikes that launched in their city early this April. Assistant principal Matthew Bennett snapped photos of the stunt in the morning, tweeting “Class of 18 strikes again.” The scene, perhaps inadvertently, demonstrates just how much space cars take up versus other modes. CityLab context: Study up on the complete taxonomy of bikeshare… this will be on the final exam.


What We’re Reading

Why do Americans stay when their town has no future? (Bloomberg)

How suburban architecture may have encouraged the kids game “The Floor Is Lava” (Quartz)

Amazon has been generous to a Seattle homeless shelter. Why is its generosity such a pain? (Slate)

Trump made an immigration crackdown a priority. Jeff Sessions made it a reality (Vox)

Why would a conservative policy group get involved in a Chicago affordable housing dispute? (ProPublica)


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