Also: The cities Americans move to—and from—for work, and what is loitering, really?

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What We’re Following

Dancing in the street: Dockless scooters are set to be the shared-mobility jam of the summer, but cities aren’t singing the same tune on regulations. Consider some of the latest moves:

In San Francisco, public records indicate that Lyft might be entering the e-scooter competition as companies contend for five potential permit slots (Fortune). Last week, Honolulu ordered LimeBike to stop after one week of unauthorized operation, classifying the electric scooters as mopeds and saying they would need permits to operate (Hawaii News Now). And earlier this month, Nashville’s cease-and-desist order to Bird got much more serious after two riders were critically injured by a driver in hit-and-run (The Tennessean).

All said, cities are picking up new moves as these scooters shake up well-trodden right-of-way rules for sidewalks and roads. But as they squeeze to find room in the street, we might just be realizing that our cities are still stuck in an old groove of getting around.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

The Supreme Court Just Made It Even Harder to Sue Your Employer

Corporations love mandatory arbitration clauses, which limit the rights of workers to take their employers to court. If limits on them are struck down, employees have other options.

Kriston Capps

The Top Cities Americans Move to—and From—For Work

Most of the top cities are the usual suspects, but there’s something odd happening in Silicon Valley.

Teresa Mathew

A Healthcare Giant Enters the Battle for Cheaper Housing

Kaiser Permanente is pledging $200 million toward fighting homelessness and building more low-cost housing in eight states, plus D.C.

Kriston Capps and Benjamin Schneider

What Will It Take to De-Segregate Chicago?

A new report offers a roadmap to inclusive growth.

Tanvi Misra

Wyatt Cenac Is Here to Solve Your Policing Problems

In his new HBO series “Problem Areas,” comedian-actor Wyatt Cenac takes a crack at solving police racism.

Brentin Mock


Let It Be

Illustration from "What Is Loitering, Really?"

“Loiter” is a weird word. It’s even stranger that, to be considered a crime, being in a certain place for a particular amount of time is always defined by somebody else. After a series of racially charged incidents of “loitering” triggered national outrage, from Starbucks in Philadelphia to a barbeque in Oakland, visual storyteller Ariel Aber-Riger dives into the long history of laws against being somewhere you’re not wanted. Her story on CityLab: What is Loitering, Really?


What We’re Reading

The eviction machine churning through New York City (New York Times)

Self-driving cars will give us more lobbies, and other possible city changes (Wired)

Wall Street’s new housing frontier: Single-family rental homes (Curbed)

The Justice Department is sending even more immigrants to prison (The Marshall Project)

Ben Carson doubles down on dismantling Obama-era fair housing policies (Washington Post)


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