Also: HQ2 employees might unwittingly pay their taxes to Amazon, and the crazies thing about Elon Musk’s plan for Chicago.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Tipping point: Next week, D.C. voters will head to the polls to decide if the minimum wage should rise for workers who earn tips. Initiative 77 is perhaps the most fraught issue in the District’s election cycle, turning the town into a proxy war between two national restaurant groups. But the lines aren’t drawn neatly: Across the city, you’ll find bosses and workers alike fighting the gradual increase in wages.

Whatever happens here, it’s just the start. With national advocacy organizations leading the charge, you can expect this battle to make its way to cities and states around the country in short order. And with limited research on tipped wages, there’s little clear evidence for voters to digest. CityLab’s Kriston Capps unpacks the lingering questions and bedrock truths in D.C.’s war over restaurant tips that will soon go national.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

HQ2 Employees Might Unwittingly Pay Their Taxes to Amazon

Some cities vying for HQ2 offer a way for companies like Amazon to automatically recoup a percentage of employees’ salaries from…the employees.

Greg LeRoy

For $1 Billion, Elon Musk’s Tunnel to O’Hare Would Be a Miracle

That’s a fraction of what subterranean transit projects cost.

Laura Bliss

Don’t Blame Expensive Housing for Falling Fertility

Lower birth rates in expensive cities are more likely due to how Americans self-sort by income, education, age, and other factors.

Richard Florida

The Planning Lesson in Iceland’s World Cup Miracle

“It’s about making long-term commitments,” said an architect in Reykjavik’s planning department.

Feargus O'Sullivan

A Motel Gets a Noble Second Life on Route 66

The transformation of Albuquerque’s Sundowner Motor Lodge appears to be part of an emerging trend where non-profit developers are seizing opportunities in old motels to create decent housing for those living on the fringes and most in need.

Ben Ikenson


Gotham on the Go

Chart showing ride-hailing mode shifts in New York City.
(NYC DOT)

Mark 2017 as the year ride-hailing overtook the taxi in New York City. For the first time, services such as Uber and Lyft made up the majority of for-hire vehicle trips in the city—with 158 million ride-hailing trips compared to 110 million traditional taxi trips. But the chart above from the NYC Department of Transportation’s 2018 Mobility Report shows that, of the New Yorkers who have used ride hailing, 50 percent say they would have otherwise taken public transit for some of those trips.

New York may be a special case, but recent research shows that many major U.S. cities have already seen ride hailing affect public transit ridership. Got similar numbers for your city? We’d love to see them: drop us a line at hello@citylab.com.


What We’re Reading

The bikeshare war is shaking up Seattle (Wired)

Skybridges and gardens aren’t public space (Curbed)

Waffle House employees keep calling the cops on black customers (Vox)

A Macy’s goes from a mall mainstay to a homeless shelter (New York Times)


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