Also: Will Uber and Lyft become different things? And auditioning for the subway.

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***

What We’re Following

HUD’s new hubs: Secretary Ben Carson is in Detroit with Mayor Mike Duggan today to unveil one of 17 “EnVision Center” community hubs that HUD is opening across the country (Detroit News). The centers, aimed at promoting “self-sufficiency,” will provide recreational, educational, job training, and other support services near HUD-assisted housing projects in communities in cities including Chicago, Philadelphia, San Diego, Youngstown, Fort Worth, and Washington, D.C. The full list of cities is available on HUD’s announcement page. The plan comes just as a new analysis finds that HUD’s proposed changes to housing assistance could raise rents for the poor by 20 percent (Associated Press).

H-2B or not: A federal judge ruled against the Justice Department’s attempt to withhold $1.6 million in police grants from Philadelphia for its status as a sanctuary city. The judge cited Shakespeare’s Hamlet on the cover page, quoting from Act IV: “No place indeed should murder sanctuarize.” (Sparknotes tells us it maybe doesn't mean what he intended it to.)

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Will Uber and Lyft Become Different Things?

Ride-hailing companies are diversifying away from their core business, but right into more direct competition.

Alexis C. Madrigal

The Experience Is Virtual. The Terror Is Real.

Director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s new VR film recreates the experience of crossing the U.S. border.

Kriston Capps

America Isn’t Ready for Disability Disaster Response This Hurricane Season

FEMA and the Red Cross talk a good game, but the disability community is skeptical.

David M. Perry

Tbilisi Comes Up for Air

Grassroots environmental activism is on the rise in the capital of post-Soviet Georgia.

Prathap Nair

Auditioning Not for Broadway, but the Subway

Each year, hundreds of musicians vie to see their name not in lights, but in pink, on a banner indicating they’ve earned official status to perform in New York City’s subway stations.

Claire Bryan


Zeroing In

An animated map shows the criminal prosecutions of undocumented immigrants between January and April 2018.
(Esri/TRAC)

In early April, Attorney General Jeff Sessions instituted a “zero tolerance” policy mandating that U.S. district attorneys along the Southwest border prosecute every person who entered the country without proper authorization to the maximum extent of the law. Already, we’re seeing the effect of that policy shift, with cases increasing by 30 percent from March to April.

The map above shows the criminal prosecutions of undocumented immigrants between January and April this year. The change is even more dramatic when compared to the first year of the Trump administration: There were prosecutions brought against 24,794 apprehended individuals, compared to the 14,785 people charged from January to April of 2017. On CityLab: The Dramatic Spike in Immigrant Prosecutions at the Border, Mapped


What We’re Reading

Can New York City’s next big park recapture the magic of the High Line? (Fast Company)

The gig economy is smaller than we thought (Quartz)

Why aren’t we buying houses on the internet? (Slate)

Building for Brexit: how architecture heralded the failure of project Europe (The Guardian)

Love City: 24 hours of romance, lust, and heartache in New York (NYT Magazine)


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