Also: Interrupting the jogging mayor, and why Vermonters fear a Mormon utopia.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Queens landing: Last fall, a CityLab collaboration with WNYC featured four women running for office in Queens, asking if local candidates can ever defeat the political machine. Apparently the answer is yes: Last night, one candidate in that story, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, pulled off a massive upset against 10-term incumbent Representative Joe Crowley in New York’s 14th congressional district, whose influence in the House is paired with significant sway in local New York City politics.

Sheriffs races: In 2018, sheriff elections are turning out to be referenda on local policies on immigration enforcement and criminal justice. Just ask Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, where activists recently managed to oust a Democrat who refused to end its collaboration with immigration authorities.

On Tuesday, a more muted version of this happened in the Republican El Paso County, Colorado, where incumbent sheriff Bill Elder seemed to have sailed to victory in last night's Republican primary—beating out the challenger Mike Angley, and essentially securing his seat for the next four years. Elder has campaigned on his war against marijuana, and recently, re-signed a contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to hold immigrant detainees. But compared to Angley, he was still moderate—declining to restart the 287(g) program that was criticized as a tool for racial profiling of immigrants.  

Facing Janus: The Supreme Court just ruled 5-4 against requiring public-sector workers to pay union fees. CityLab’s Sarah Holder has the update to her story on who is likely to be most affected by the ruling.

Andrew Small and Tanvi Misra


More on CityLab

He’s Running; Interrupt Him

If mayors don’t like being interrupted on their jogs, they may want to invest in a treadmill.

Tanvi Misra

The Geography of Talent Shows a Gaining Rust Belt and Sunbelt

Data suggests that Rust Belt and Sunbelt cities are adding highly educated adults—but established knowledge and tech hubs continue to dominate on one important measure.

Richard Florida

Why Vermonters Fear This Mormon Utopia

The National Trust for Historic Preservation’s latest list of America’s most endangered historic places includes four Vermont towns set to host a vast micro-housing development based of the visions of Joseph Smith.

Kriston Capps

The Disoriented Lives of North Korean Defectors

Negotiating Seoul’s subway system and living in the South can be a jarring leap into the modern world.

Sam Weber

The Price of Domestic Workers’ Invisible Labor in U.S. Border Towns

“The fear is historic in this region and the policies of hate in this administration have reached new levels,” says a community organizer in Alamo, Texas.

Sarah Holder

The Mundane Joys of Playing a Bus Simulator

In Bus Simulator 18, you’ll pick up passengers, dodge potholes, and avoid bankruptcy. Too real?

Linda Poon


Hello Yellow Brick Road

KUOW chart shows percentage growth in household income in Seattle
(KUOW)

It’s no secret that Seattle has undergone a decade of rapid economic growth. But it’s particularly jarring when you compare the Emerald City to the rest of the country. Seattle’s NPR station KUOW took a look at how many people in the 1 percent live in Seattle now—and how much wealthier they’ve become. Seattle has three times as many households in the top 1 percent of earners compared to the national average, with 9,245 households earning more than $470,000 a year.

The chart above shows the percentage growth in household income from 2006 to 2016 for the 25th percentile and 99th percentile of earners in Seattle (green) compared to the country as a whole (red). While it might look like Seattle’s boom is making everyone wealthier, there’s a key caveat: rising housing prices have pushed some people out, potentially making lower-income brackets appear to be doing better than they actually are. CityLab context: The precipitous fall of Seattle’s “Amazon tax”


What We’re Reading

East Pittsburgh police officer charged in Antwon Rose’s killing (New York Times)

The cities trying out universal basic income (The Guardian)

Distracted driving is out of control, and there’s no single cure (Wired)

The remaking of class in America (The New Republic)

An ode to the unsung ritual of giving and getting directions (Places Journal)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A Fifties-style diner with blue booths and chairs and pink walls.
    Design

    Why a ‘Memory Town’ Is Coming to Your Local Strip Mall

    Weeks after opening near San Diego, a model town for treating dementia is set to be replicated around the U.S.

  2. A large adventure playground with towers and slides.
    Design

    A Short Guide to Tulsa’s New $465 Million Park

    If Volcanoville and Charlie’s Water Mountain aren’t enough for you, what about a boating pond and a skate park?

  3. Design

    How Boston Got Its ‘T’

    Designers Peter Chermayeff and Tom Geismar talk about how they gave the MBTA an enduring makeover.

  4. Passengers wait in a German subway station
    Transportation

    The Global Mass Transit Revolution

    A new report confirms that the U.S. lags behind the rest of the world in mass transit.

  5. Equity

    When a Hospital Plays Housing Developer

    A children’s hospital in Columbus, Ohio, is trying to treat a difficult patient: Its own struggling neighborhood.