Also: Wisconsin wants Millennials, and lessons from that raccoon’s climb up a tower.

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***

What We’re Following

London calling: After a nail-biting election, London Breed is set to become San Francisco’s first black female mayor. The city’s ranked-choice voting produced an incredibly close race, with Breed’s opponent, Mark Leno, appearing to take the lead on election night. But by the weekend, mail-in ballots pushed Breed into the lead on the too-close-to-call contest, and on Wednesday, Leno conceded.

Breed now joins the ranks of the mayors of 15 largest cities in the United States; she’s the only woman currently in that group, and the fourth person of color. If you expand the selection to the top 20 cities, she’s got some company: Charlotte, Seattle, Fort Worth, and D.C. all have women leading city hall. But Breed pushes the number of women mayors in the top 100 U.S. cities up to 21, according to the Center for American Women and Politics. CityLab context: In City Halls, There Are More Women Than Ever Before

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Move to Wisconsin, Millennials! (Just Don't Forget Your Car.)

As the state spends millions to lure under-40 workers from across the Midwest, local transit riders are stuck in place.

Laura Bliss

Domino’s Pizza Is Fixing Potholes Now, and That’s Fine

Pizza delivery and infrastructure repair go together like ham and pineapple.

Andrew Zaleski

Seoul’s ‘War Preppers’ Are Still (Sort Of) Expecting the Worst

As fears of North Korean attack wane, some residents of the South Korean capital are finding it hard to maintain their emergency preparations.  

Matt Neuman

Lessons From the Raccoon That Scaled a Skyscraper

The critter that climbed a 25-story building in St. Paul, Minnesota, is a reminder: We could design for cohabitation between humans and urban wildlife.

Linda Poon

The Costs Behind Hockey’s Return to Long Island

A “privately financed” venue for the New York Islanders has been touted by Governor Andrew Cuomo as a “win-win-win.” But it comes with open-ended public costs.

Norman Oder


Mistake on the Lake

Photo of Balloonfest
(Balloonfest/The Atlantic)

In September 1986, a nonprofit staged a fundraiser where it released 1.5 million balloons over the city of Cleveland in an attempt to beat Disneyland’s Guinness World Record for the most balloons released simultaneously. It did not end well.

Balloonfest, a short documentary by Nathan Truesdell, depicts the helium-filled spectacle as the colorful orbs wrap around Cleveland’s Terminal Tower. But a storm brings the balloons down and they wreak havoc on the city, litter Lake Erie, and, tragically, impede a Coast Guard search and rescue mission for two missing fisherman. Using archival news footage from local television station, the awe-inspiring and haunting film is a sobering reminder of the short-sightedness of humankind.

Watch The Balloonfest That Went Horribly Wrong on our sister site, The Atlantic.


What We’re Reading

The true value of controlling the curb (Curbed)

Elon Musk’s Boring Company will give Chicago a lift to the airport (Chicago Tribune)

Did Donald Trump really cause America’s tourism slump? (Quartz)

Young families typically leave cities for the suburbs. Here’s how to keep them downtown. (Vox)

How much can Democrats rely on suburban liberals? (New York Times)


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