Also: We’re not prepared for hurricane season, and Vermont will pay remote workers to move there.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Brace yourselves: Today is the official start of hurricane season in the Atlantic, but cities are still waiting for their federal aid money as they recover from last year’s devastating storms, as Bloomberg reports. Texas is still waiting for a third of its expected $695 million in federal funds to arrive, and Florida has only received 1 percent of the $83 million it’s been promised.

Meanwhile in Puerto Rico, CBS News reports there are still 11,000 people without power after Hurricane Maria last year, and some communities on the island are turning to community land trusts to negotiate with FEMA (Next City). And as we realize the full scope of Maria’s impact on the territory, disability groups are speaking up about the need for all levels of government to include the disability community in disaster response plans (Pacific Standard).

Read more:

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

What Mayors Are Talking About

In their annual state of the city addresses, mayors are calling out the elephant in the room.

Nicole Flatow

A '70s Planning Dream Meets Reality in Baltimore

After Moshe Safdie’s thesis project in Montreal brought him instant fame in 1967, a chance to build a new community in Baltimore turned into a reality check.

Anthony Paletta

Vermont's Plan to Attract Workers (But Not Their Jobs)

The state will give remote workers up to $10,000 to move in, as long as their full-time job stays somewhere else.

Teresa Mathew

Tom Wolfe on 5 Cities

The late journalist and novelist was an exuberant chronicler of urban settings.

Anthony Flint

When New Delhi’s Informal Settlements Make Way For Something ‘Smarter’

It only takes one visit to the basti at Kidwai Nagar to understand why its residents want to be relocated. But life on the outside may still not be much better.

Ashish Malhotra


Work It Out

A chart shows the most popular side hustles in the U.S.
(MarketWatch)

About 78 million Americans make money outside of their 9-to-5 job, according to a new survey by the Federal Reserve. The chart above from MarketWatch shows what sorts of side hustles are the most common in today’s gig economy. It’s what you might expect: people sell stuff on Craigslist, rent out property through Airbnb, and drive for Uber and Lyft, along with some more classic chores such as yard work and cleaning or dog sitting and babysitting. But for three-fourths of people who earned money outside of their job, that extra work provides less than 10 percent of their family income, and only 5 percent make more than half their income that way.

CityLab context: The two faces of freelancing and what the gig economy looks like in cities.


What We’re Reading

Lyft nears acquisition of Motivate, a U.S. bikeshare leader (The Information)

Electric scooters are the cargo shorts of transportation (The Atlantic)

This is the video Starbucks showed its employees for its racial bias training (Quartz)

As office parks empty, towns turn vacancies into opportunities (New York Times)

How the urban, rural, and suburban divide explains America’s divide on guns (Washington Post)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    A History of the American Public Library

    A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

  2. Equity

    Berlin Builds an Arsenal of Ideas to Stage a Housing Revolution

    The proposals might seem radical—from banning huge corporate landlords to freezing rents for five years—but polls show the public is ready for something dramatic.

  3. Multicolored maps of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Tampa, denoting neighborhood fragmentation
    Equity

    Urban Neighborhoods, Once Distinct by Race and Class, Are Blurring

    Yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods.

  4. a photo of a used needle in a park in Lawrence, Massachusetts.
    Equity

    Why the Rural Opioid Crisis Is Different From the Urban One

    As deaths from heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioids soar in the U.S., a new study looks at the geographic factors driving the drug overdose epidemic.

  5. Equity

    When Workers and Jobs Are Too Far Apart

    Mapping job openings with available employees in major U.S. cities reveals a striking spatial mismatch, according to a new Urban Institute report.