Also today: How Ohio’s voter purge targets cities, and Seattle’s “Amazon tax” is dead.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Buckeye voting: On Monday, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 to uphold a voter purging practice in Ohio, which drops voters from registration lists after missing just one federal election. The places most affected by the voter roll clearing will be the Buckeye State’s largest metropolises of Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Columbus.

But the state’s mechanism for checking up on voters who skip an election—by mailing documents to the registered address to confirm the voter still lives there—raises the stakes especially for voters who get evicted or displaced. The decision in Ohio opens the door for other states to craft their own residency-based purges, jeopardizing the votes of people of color, of low income, and people who live in cities, all of whom are more likely to change their address between elections. Read more from Brentin Mock on CityLab: Ohio’s Voter Purging Process Is About Disenfranchising Cities.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

What You Have to Earn to Rent a Modest 2-Bedroom, Mapped

There isn’t a single state, city, or county in the U.S. where someone earning federal or state minimum wage for a 40-hour work week can afford a two-bedroom home at fair market rent.

Tanvi Misra

The Precipitous Fall of Seattle’s ‘Amazon Tax’

The city’s ambitious plan to fund affordable housing by taxing corporations had a very short life. What happened?

Sarah Holder

Venezuela’s Biggest Airport Is in Free Fall

Since 2014, more than a dozen airlines have stopped operating from Maiquetía airport in Caracas because of the country’s political and economic crisis.

Martín Echenique

When Caribbean Culture Meets Gentrification

Camilo José Vergara takes his camera to Brooklyn’s Bed-Stuy neighborhood.

Camilo José Vergara

San Francisco Still Doesn’t Know Who Its Mayor Will Be

Ranked-choice voting has produced the closest citywide election in decades, as the race between London Breed and Mark Leno remains uncalled a week later.

Russell Berman


Eyes on the Tweets

(Evan Frost/MPR News)

This little raccoon transfixed Twitter’s attention as it climbed more than 20 stories yesterday up the UBS Tower in St. Paul, Minnesota. Less than a block away, Minnesota Public Radio quickly branded the skyscraper daredevil as #MPRraccoon—and after a night of intense internet drama, the critter was captured safely by animal welfare, MPR reports. Urbanists latched onto this little urban climber for good tweet fodder. Here are a few highlights:

CityLab’s Linda Poon will have more soon on what we can learn from this masked city wondercritter. In the meantime, enjoy CityLab’s coverage of urban citizens of all species in our Animals Week series from last summer.


What We’re Reading

Trump administration looking to erect tent cities for unaccompanied migrant children (McClatchy)

What happens when a rural town loses its only school? (New York Times)

Here are the cities that will be hosting the 2026 World Cup (Business Insider)

Persistent Silicon Valley billionaire earns ballot spot on splitting California into three states (Washington Post)

Can underpass reuse redeem urban freeways? (Slate)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    Why Public Transportation Works Better Outside the U.S.

    The widespread failure of American mass transit is usually blamed on cheap gas and suburban sprawl. But the full story of why other countries succeed is more complicated.

  2. Life

    How Manhattan Became a Rich Ghost Town

    New York’s empty storefronts are a dark omen for the future of cities.

  3. vacant store fronts in mining town in Arizona
    Equity

    America’s Worsening Geographic Inequality

    The economic gap between have and have-not places continues to widen.

  4. Design

    A Step-by-Step Guide for Fixing Badly Planned American Cities

    An excerpt from Jeff Speck’s Walkable City Rules, a step-by-step guide to fixing America’s cities and towns.

  5. North Korean soldiers carry the Korean People's Army flag as they walk past residential buildings along Ryomyong Street in Pyongyang.
    Design

    What's Behind North Korea’s Building Boom?

    Kim Jong-un is transforming Pyongyang, the Hermit State’s capital city, into a high-rise-filled “socialist fairyland.”