Also: Route 66 for cyclists, and a trip to the repair cafe.

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***

What We’re Following

Carolina on my mind: Believe it or not, the gears are already in motion for the 2020 elections, and that includes finding cities to host political conventions. But for Charlotte, expected to get the nod for the Republican convention, it wasn’t an easy decision to welcome the party of Donald Trump to the city. The city council spent three-and-a-half hours in a passionate debate Monday before narrowly voting 6-5 to allow the Republican National Convention to come to town.

At the center of the debate was how to weigh a convention’s economic benefits against the message of welcoming President Trump. Mayor Vi Lyles, a Democrat who championed the bid, defended the decision, saying that “hosting the RNC is not an endorsement of the administration.” But before the vote, city councilman Justin Harlow said, “I’d no sooner bring Donald Trump and the RNC to Charlotte… than I would support a Klan rally in this city” (Charlotte Observer). It’s a tension that may have been unavoidable, as one North Carolina Republican put it: “The fact is—it’s just a reality—that more of the big cities in America are governed by Democrats” (New York Times).

CityLab context: Is hosting a political convention ever worth it for a mayor?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Get Your Kicks Biking Route 66

Cyclists are now rolling on U.S. Bike Route 66 in Missouri and Kansas, the first stretch of a route planned for the whole length of the historic 2,400-mile highway.

Michael Charboneau

What ‘Skyscraper’ Doesn’t Get About Skyscrapers

The Rock’s new movie should have gotten more thrills out of high-rise design, an engineer argues.

Alex Weinberg

Will Cairo Survive Ben Carson?

HUD is shutting down two of the largest housing projects in Cairo, Illinois, leaving the town’s fate to a higher power.

Martha Park

Don’t Throw It Away—Take It to the Repair Cafe

This series of workshops aims to keep broken items out of the landfill, and it might help you save a few bucks, too.

Linda Poon

Can Cities Shape the Automated Future?

Urban spaces are the testing grounds for the automation revolution. Will they destroy our jobs, or just make new and better ones?

Brooks Rainwater


Movin’ On Up

Where you live has a lot to do with how much you earn, and how far it can go. The rule of thumb is this: For every $1,000 increase in earnings, the cost of living is about 1 percentage point higher. But that’s not always the case: The chart above from the Hamilton Project at Brookings shows how far your income will get you in some metro areas compared to others. Places below the trendline but above the national cost-of-living average (x-axis) find a more ideal balance between the two factors, like Minneapolis or Boston. Even the more extreme high-cost cities like D.C. and San Francisco tend to have higher wages to compensate—but that’s not so much the case for New York or L.A.

There’s also an interactive map paired with the report that picks out the data by profession, so you can game out if taking your urban planning skills from Portland ($65,821 median) to Seattle ($82,431 median) is really worth the move.


What We’re Reading

NYPD will pursue internal charges against officers in Eric Garner’s death (NPR)

Residents in tourism hotspots have had enough. So what’s the answer? (The Guardian)

BMW is launching an Uber and Lyft competitor in Seattle (Wired)

Why the West is best for city cycling in the U.S. (Next City)

Op-ed: Why would we sacrifice safety at New York schools? (New York Times)


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