Also: Route 66 for cyclists, and a trip to the repair cafe.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.

***

What We’re Following

Carolina on my mind: Believe it or not, the gears are already in motion for the 2020 elections, and that includes finding cities to host political conventions. But for Charlotte, expected to get the nod for the Republican convention, it wasn’t an easy decision to welcome the party of Donald Trump to the city. The city council spent three-and-a-half hours in a passionate debate Monday before narrowly voting 6-5 to allow the Republican National Convention to come to town.

At the center of the debate was how to weigh a convention’s economic benefits against the message of welcoming President Trump. Mayor Vi Lyles, a Democrat who championed the bid, defended the decision, saying that “hosting the RNC is not an endorsement of the administration.” But before the vote, city councilman Justin Harlow said, “I’d no sooner bring Donald Trump and the RNC to Charlotte… than I would support a Klan rally in this city” (Charlotte Observer). It’s a tension that may have been unavoidable, as one North Carolina Republican put it: “The fact is—it’s just a reality—that more of the big cities in America are governed by Democrats” (New York Times).

CityLab context: Is hosting a political convention ever worth it for a mayor?

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

Get Your Kicks Biking Route 66

Cyclists are now rolling on U.S. Bike Route 66 in Missouri and Kansas, the first stretch of a route planned for the whole length of the historic 2,400-mile highway.

Michael Charboneau

What ‘Skyscraper’ Doesn’t Get About Skyscrapers

The Rock’s new movie should have gotten more thrills out of high-rise design, an engineer argues.

Alex Weinberg

Will Cairo Survive Ben Carson?

HUD is shutting down two of the largest housing projects in Cairo, Illinois, leaving the town’s fate to a higher power.

Martha Park

Don’t Throw It Away—Take It to the Repair Cafe

This series of workshops aims to keep broken items out of the landfill, and it might help you save a few bucks, too.

Linda Poon

Can Cities Shape the Automated Future?

Urban spaces are the testing grounds for the automation revolution. Will they destroy our jobs, or just make new and better ones?

Brooks Rainwater


Movin’ On Up

Where you live has a lot to do with how much you earn, and how far it can go. The rule of thumb is this: For every $1,000 increase in earnings, the cost of living is about 1 percentage point higher. But that’s not always the case: The chart above from the Hamilton Project at Brookings shows how far your income will get you in some metro areas compared to others. Places below the trendline but above the national cost-of-living average (x-axis) find a more ideal balance between the two factors, like Minneapolis or Boston. Even the more extreme high-cost cities like D.C. and San Francisco tend to have higher wages to compensate—but that’s not so much the case for New York or L.A.

There’s also an interactive map paired with the report that picks out the data by profession, so you can game out if taking your urban planning skills from Portland ($65,821 median) to Seattle ($82,431 median) is really worth the move.


What We’re Reading

NYPD will pursue internal charges against officers in Eric Garner’s death (NPR)

Residents in tourism hotspots have had enough. So what’s the answer? (The Guardian)

BMW is launching an Uber and Lyft competitor in Seattle (Wired)

Why the West is best for city cycling in the U.S. (Next City)

Op-ed: Why would we sacrifice safety at New York schools? (New York Times)


Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Stuyvesant Town and Peter Cooper Village
    Perspective

    How Low Turnover Fuels New York City’s Affordable Housing Crisis

    American Community Survey data shows that New Yorkers stay in apartments, including rent-regulated ones, for longer than most, leaving little room for newcomers.

  2. A photo of a post office in the snow.
    Life

    A Prayer for the Post Office

    While USPS workers deliver Christmas gifts, Mark Dimondstein, president of the American Postal Workers’ Union, is busy fending off demands to privatize the mail.

  3. Five dragon decorations sit on the front lawn of a Louisiana home.
    Life

    Her Neighbor Hated Her Dragon Nativity Scene. So She Got More Dragons.

    A lesson in Christmastime neighborliness from South Louisiana.

  4. A data visualization shows 200 years of immigration to the U.S. represented as a thickening tree trunk.
    Life

    A New Way of Seeing 200 Years of American Immigration

    To depict how waves of immigrants shaped the United States, a team of designers looked to nature as a model.

  5. A photo of a "yellow vest" protester in Paris, where high gas taxes have contributed to a wave of unrest.
    Environment

    What France’s ‘Yellow Vest’ Protests Can Teach California

    A lesson from Paris: Policies that reduce climate emissions at the expense of the economically disadvantaged are unsustainable.