Also: Animals need infrastructure too, and it’s time to worry about the census.

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***

What We’re Following

Urban outliers: Just by sheer numbers, Millennials are set to dramatically remake American society—the 83 million adults under 40 make up the nation’s largest generation ever. For urbanists, that raises a big question: Will they continue moving downtown, or will they migrate out to the suburbs? As it turns out, it’s a little of both.

A chart shows population growth of 25 to 34 year olds by distance from city center.
Source: Hyojung Lee (David H. Montgomery/CityLab)

The chart above, based on the 50 largest U.S. metro areas, shows how Millennials are indeed living closer to city centers than previous generations. Adults between 25 and 34 are living within 10 miles of city centers at much greater rates since 2010 than in the previous decade—and much of that growth is happening in urban areas just outside of downtown. In absolute terms, more people in this age range are living in the suburbs, though growth has leveled off. But one thing’s for sure: As that last bar indicates, young adults living outside metro areas in the U.S. has plummeted in the 2010s.

CityLab’s Kriston Capps digs into the “peak Millennial” paradox: Do Millennials Prefer Cities or Suburbs? Maybe Both.

Andrew Small


More on CityLab

How Trump Is Targeting California’s Air Pollution Standards

At stake: The state’s half-century-long right to regulate auto emissions.

Karim Doumar

Animals Need Infrastructure Too

Highways are dangerous barriers for all sorts of wildlife. Around the world, bridges and tunnels just for animals make it easier for them to migrate, mate, eat, and survive.

Sarah Holder

How the Other Half Eats

SNAP benefits add up to $1.86 per person, per meal. Here's what that looks like.

Ariel Aberg-Riger

It’s Time to Worry About the Census

From cybersecurity issues to administrative problems to a legal drama over a possible citizenship question, the decennial head count is in trouble.

Vann R. Newkirk II

Maize Sellers Where Skyscrapers Could Be

Africa is rapidly urbanizing but central city development is not keeping pace.

Astrid Haas


What We’re Reading

A look back at Trayvon Martin’s death and the movement it inspired (NPR)

Young people don’t want construction jobs. That’s a problem for the housing market. (Wall Street Journal)

Cyclists protest Chicago’s disproportionate bike ticketing for people of color (Streetsblog Chicago)

Under Trump, asbestos might be making a comeback (Fast Company)

How a citizenship question could mean less representation in Congress for big cities (New York Times)


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