Also: How cars divide America, and a scam alert for renters.

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What We’re Following

War is over?: Last week, the White House Council of Economic Advisors declared that the War On Poverty was “largely over and a success.” That declaration might come as a surprise to the millions of American children who benefit from safety-net programs for food, housing, and healthcare, and who are still living in what looks and feels a lot like poverty.

While Congress has yet to pass cuts to aid, we’re already seeing a downward trend in spending for children in the federal budget. As the Trump administration emphasizes “self-sufficiency” and work requirements, economists say we could be squandering our investment in the next generation. CityLab’s Kriston Capps has the story: The ‘War on Poverty’ Isn’t Over, and Kids Are Losing

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Andrew Small


More on CityLab

How Cars Divide America

Car dependence not only reduces our quality of life, it’s a crucial factor in America’s economic and political divisions.

Richard Florida

Summer of Scams, Apartment Rental Edition

Tenant beware: Some cities are hotbeds of rental fraud, and Millennials are the most vulnerable targets.

Sarah Holder

Munich Wants a Gondola (Not a Tourist Attraction)

In a flat city with good transit, a proposed overhead line could close a gap in the existing network. Here's what the plan gets right.

Feargus O'Sullivan

Seeing the Beauty in Ukraine’s Soviet Architecture

The authors of an upcoming book on the nation’s most threatened buildings have a dramatic short film that makes a case for preservation.

Karim Doumar

Can Florida’s Toxic Algae Be Stopped?

The algae blooms pose risks to humans and marine animals—and to Florida’s tourism-dependent economy.

Rebecca Renner


Emission Control

A pie chart shows emissions from electricity, buildings, and transportation.
(America’s Pledge)

It’s been one year since the Trump administration withdrew from the Paris Agreement on climate change, but there’s still a lot that can be done to improve our climate footprint. Bloomberg Philanthropies has some ideas in its annual America’s Pledge report for reducing emissions from electricity, fuel use in buildings, and transportation. The charts above show how much those sectors make up of the total greenhouse gas emissions produced by the United States in 2016.

According to the report, 42 percent of the country’s electricity consumption occurs in the 1,400 cities in the U.S. Conference of Mayors, and two-thirds of miles traveled by American drivers are in urban areas. From clean energy to mass transit, there are plenty of ways cities can fight climate change in the near-term, even without the federal government. Related: If the U.S. Won’t Keep the Paris Agreement, Can Cities and States?


What We’re Reading

Under Trump, transit expansion projects are starving for federal funds (Streetsblog)

Let children design their own playgrounds (Curbed)

Airbnb can’t win in New York—but it can’t quit either (Wired)

Dockless bikeshare company Ofo is backpedaling from North America (Quartz)

Chance the Rapper bought Chicagoist and announced it in a new song (Gothamist)


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